10 Ways to Conquer Your Fear of Gardening

You might not believe it, but you were born with a green thumb. It may have gone untended for a while, but it's there waiting for you to nudge it awake. Put away your theory of being a plant killer, that anything dies under your care. Forget those nagging thoughts of where your garden will live or when you'll find the time, it's there somewhere. It doesn't have to cost a fortune and you'll get more than you give. So, here are 10 tips for conquering your fear of gardening:

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Gardening Tips for Renters

Want to bring more green to your house or apartment? Using a few easy, inexpensive techniques, <a href="http://www.thehorticult.com/">The Horticult</a> shows how you can garden like you own the place -- without risking your security deposit. You don't have to own your home to create a garden that reflects your personal style. Grow your favorite plants and create an inspired landscape -- or patio, interior, or balcony -- using these fun, low-commitment methods. (Although you might want to check with your landlord about the larger projects!) And if you move, you can take it all with you. These 10 tips for renters will give your garden a new lease on life.

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Summer Checklist

Summer is a gardener¿s busiest season. If you¿re short on time or not sure what to do, follow this easy summer gardening checklist to keep your lawn and garden in great shape all season long.

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Drought-Tolerant Grasses

Drought! The word itself strikes fear into the hearts of gardeners everywhere. Scarce water resources, especially in hard hit areas such as California and Texas, are making it almost impossible to maintain traditional style lawns. That's why many people are replacing their lawns with groundcovers and native plants. But for those who want a lush green lawn, here are some less-thirsty options.

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How to Improve Garden Soil

Many homeowners inherit bad garden soil ¿ but you don¿t have to live with it! Learn how to get the best garden soil possible through amendments, composting, and more.

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Top Shade Perennials

Shade plants are perfect for those tough spots in your yard. Learn about the best shade-loving perennials, including flowering shade perennials, partial shade perennials, and full-shade perennials.

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Landscape Ideas

Landscape ideas provide inspiration, and studies show that upgrading your landscape will add value to your home. Here are some great landscape ideas to improve your home's outward appeal.

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Popular in Gardening

Heritage Vegetable Garden

Enjoy the fruits of your labor in this heritage-filled edible garden.

Free Garden Plan

Our free Planting Guide for this garden includes a larger version of the illustration, a detailed layout diagram, a list of plants for the garden as shown, a list of alternatives for each plant, and complete instructions for installing the garden. (Free, one-time registration allows unlimited access to Planting Guides for all garden plans.)

This home vegetable garden will prove to be satisfying and pleasurable. Just watching it grow and transform is magical. This garden includes traditional vegetables with many being heirloom varieties like Brandywine tomatoes and purple dragon carrot. Often heirloom seeds are chosen be cause the seed can be saved and will produce true-to-type offspring. These varieties have been around for a long time because they not only offer exceptional pollination but also have survived pests and disease. Plus they taste wonderful!

Because space may be limited in a home garden, a French method of mixing seeds can be used as it has here. Combining spinach and carrot seed and sowing together will use the space better. The spinach will also soften the ground, making it easier for carrots to grow. In about six weeks, the spinach will be finished and the carrots will develop. Combining radishes and lettuce in the same row will also give good succession.

Tomatoes will need to be staked and the peas will need trellises. The beans and cucumbers may benefit from a low support structure, but it isn't necessary. Crop rotation is often recommended but not always easy in a smaller garden. Shift if you can, otherwise add annual applications of compost and soil to replenish nutrients and avoid buildup of pests and disease.

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