Holiday-Inspired Outdoor Decorating that Lasts

Dress up your front porch and yard with these holiday outdoor decorating ideas that last from the first days of fall through the New Year. They look great on a porch or just outside your door.

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Outdoor Christmas Decorating Ideas

Make the outside of your home as ready for the holiday season as the inside with these outdoor Christmas decorating ideas. Our holiday decorating ideas, including beautiful Christmas greenery, festive light displays, and more, are sure to get your yard Christmas-ready.

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Grow Beautiful Amaryllis

Amaryllis flowers are easy to grow from bulbs and great for adding color to your holiday decor.

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Deer-Resistant Shade Plants

Gardening in the shade where deer are plentiful can be a challenging situation. But there are plants that thrive in the shade that aren't tempting to hungry deer. Although no plant can be considered completely deer-resistant, here's a list of shade dwellers that most deer avoid. Plus, we've added some fun facts about deer that might help you understand them better.

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Shrubs with Winter Interest

A winter landscape has a beauty all its own. An unexpected plant feature -- winter blooms that perfume the air, bright berries, colorful or textured foliage or unusual bark -- add a welcome element to gardens. These winter shrubs will not disappoint.

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Tips for Moving Plants Indoors

Here's a handy guide for moving your favorite plants inside once the weather turns cold.

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Stop Sawflies

Although this pest looks like a worm or a slug, it's neither, and that makes a difference in what control measures work on it.

Sawflies are one of the few insects in the wasp family that feed on plants. The adult resembles a fly or a wasp without a constricted waist. But it's the worm-like larva that causes damage to plants. The adults do not eat and cannot sting.

Identifying the Pest

Some larvae look like caterpillars with three pairs of large legs and seven pairs of smaller false legs. The larvae may appear individually, but often form clusters of dozens of chewing defoliators. It's common to see them lined up along the edge of leaves or needles. When disturbed, they may raise their abdomen and tail end into an s-shape defensive position.

Other sawfly larvae resemble slugs, with a slimy non-segmented body. This group of sawfly larvae usually feeds only on the leaf surface, leaving a skeleton of leaf veins where they feed.

Sawfly Life Cycle

Adult sawflies lay eggs in or on leaves. The larvae hatch out in late spring or early summer and begin feeding. They spin cocoons when fully grown. Some species have only one generation per year; others may have several generations.

Sawfly Control

The best time to control sawflies is early in their larval stage. The natural insecticide spinosad will control sawfly larvae. Conventional insecticides such as malathion are also effective. Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis), which is an effective natural control for true caterpillars, is ineffective on sawfly larvae.

Host Plants

Most sawflies attack only one species or closely related species of plants, and the common name of the sawfly usually includes its host. Examples are:

Ash Sawfly (Blackheaded and Brownheaded)
Dogwood Sawfly
Dusky Birch Sawfly
Elm Sawfly
Larch Sawfly
Loblolly Pine Sawfly
Mountain Ash Sawfly
Oak Sawfly
Pear Sawfly (also known as Pear Slug)
Pine Sawfly (European, Introduced, Redheaded, and Virginia)
Raspberry Sawfly
Roseslug Sawfly
White Pine Sawfly
Willow Sawfly
Yellowheaded Spruce Sawfly


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