Miniature Fairy Garden

Combining drought-tolerant succulents, Cotswold cottages, and elevated beds will lend easy inspection of the wee landscaping of a miniature garden.

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The Best Drought-Tolerant Perennials

When summer heat kicks in, rely on these drought-tolerant plants to hold their own -- and still look beautiful.

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Heat-Loving Container-Garden Plants

The dog days of summer can turn your gorgeous container gardens into a crispy mess. Try these plants that take the heat for color all season long.

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Summer Garden Maintenance Checklist

Summer is a gardener¿s busiest season. If you¿re short on time or not sure what to do, follow this easy summer gardening checklist to keep your lawn and garden in great shape all season long.

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Throw a Garden Party

Greet the season with friends, flowers, and ice cream floats! Featuring pretty paper blooms and a blushing peach punch, this lovely garden gathering will have you celebrating summer in style.

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Creating Succulent Containers

Succulent gardens are low maintenance and make great container gardens -- they can withstand heat, neglect, and direct sunlight. Learn tips and tricks to create a gorgeous succulent container garden.

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Top Plants that Thrive in Clay

Clay soil makes gardening tough. It's slippery when wet, and it bakes solid when dry. Here are 25 beautiful plants that grow well in clay.

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Popular in Gardening

How to Plant Around a Pond

Create a natural-looking pond edge by carefully tucking in plants alongside weathered rocks to camouflage the pond liner. As seen in Country Gardens magazine.

By wedging plants into the crevices and letting them spill around, the pond appears to be nature's own work. Here's how to create this look:

Tools and Materials:

  • Gloves
  • Compost
  • Tropical ferns such as Nephrolepis and Asplenium nidus
  • Hand trowel

Step 1

Add compost to amend the soil, building up the pond's edge to disguise the liner and hold plants firmly in place.

Step 2

Remove the fern from its container and shake excess potting soil from the roots. Where space is limited, wedge the plants into crevices and between rocks. Reducing each plant's footprint results in a natural look.

Step 3

Using a hand trowel and taking care not to damage the liner, dig a hole and insert a fern into the hole.

Step 4

Firm the fern into position, pulling the compost in the hole and covering the roots. Be sure to water thoroughly after planting. Keep the newly transplanted fern moist for several days immediately after transplanting.

Learn more about ferns.

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