10 Ways to Conquer Your Fear of Gardening

You might not believe it, but you were born with a green thumb. It may have gone untended for a while, but it's there waiting for you to nudge it awake. Put away your theory of being a plant killer, that anything dies under your care. Forget those nagging thoughts of where your garden will live or when you'll find the time, it's there somewhere. It doesn't have to cost a fortune and you'll get more than you give. So, here are 10 tips for conquering your fear of gardening:

See More

Gardening Tips for Renters

Want to bring more green to your house or apartment? Using a few easy, inexpensive techniques, <a href="http://www.thehorticult.com/">The Horticult</a> shows how you can garden like you own the place -- without risking your security deposit. You don't have to own your home to create a garden that reflects your personal style. Grow your favorite plants and create an inspired landscape -- or patio, interior, or balcony -- using these fun, low-commitment methods. (Although you might want to check with your landlord about the larger projects!) And if you move, you can take it all with you. These 10 tips for renters will give your garden a new lease on life.

View Slideshow

Summer Checklist

Summer is a gardener¿s busiest season. If you¿re short on time or not sure what to do, follow this easy summer gardening checklist to keep your lawn and garden in great shape all season long.

View Video

Drought-Tolerant Grasses

Drought! The word itself strikes fear into the hearts of gardeners everywhere. Scarce water resources, especially in hard hit areas such as California and Texas, are making it almost impossible to maintain traditional style lawns. That's why many people are replacing their lawns with groundcovers and native plants. But for those who want a lush green lawn, here are some less-thirsty options.

See More

How to Improve Garden Soil

Many homeowners inherit bad garden soil ¿ but you don¿t have to live with it! Learn how to get the best garden soil possible through amendments, composting, and more.

View Video

Top Shade Perennials

Shade plants are perfect for those tough spots in your yard. Learn about the best shade-loving perennials, including flowering shade perennials, partial shade perennials, and full-shade perennials.

View Video

Landscape Ideas

Landscape ideas provide inspiration, and studies show that upgrading your landscape will add value to your home. Here are some great landscape ideas to improve your home's outward appeal.

View Slideshow
Popular in Gardening

Gazebos in the Landscape

A gazebo offers an alluring way to enjoy the landscape.

X

    Everything in this slideshow

    • Good Looks

      A pretty collection of plants surrounds this traditional gazebo.

      • -- Open sections of a gazebo offer a good spot to integrate plants in window boxes.
      • -- Placement of the entrance and furniture orients the view from the gazebo -- here, toward other planting beds.
      • -- A gazebo can also help define a yard's border, especially if the gazebo's back is aligned with a fence.
      • Most gazebos have one defined entry point, which allows for more natural (and usable) placement of furniture.
      • If lighting inside the gazebo isn't required, nearby landscape lighting can help with safety and ambiance.
    • Charmed Life

      Fabric dresses up this simply styled gazebo.

      • Since most gazebos have sides that are open to the elements, outdoor-safe fabric drapes offer a solution to shield sun and the view.
      • Informally spaced pavers lead to the gazebo's entryway.
      • Gazebos with open sides provide a good spot to include hanging baskets.
      • Gazebos can have built-in elements, but a completely open floor plan offers more flexibility in furniture arrangement and use.
      • When designing a gazebo, pay attention to the small details. This one includes extra touches such as a rounded cap piece at the rooftop.
    • Graceful Gazebo

      An attached patio offers design inspiration.

      • Utilize a gazebo as a natural extension of your deck.
      • Sides of a gazebo may be left open or screened; the latter will likely increase gazebo use time as it keeps out insects and even light rain.
      • Create consistency between house and patio by repeating details and materials. Here, the rail design and wood stain from the house are repeated on the gazebo.
      • Curves in the surrounding flowerbeds echo curves on the gazebo.
      • This gazebo's location under several large trees offers natural shade protection.
    • Lovely Lattice

      An ordinary material gets a facelift in this pretty gazebo.

      • Lattice is an oft-used material in outdoor structures, but here it's put to unusual use: filling the space between the columns of the gazebo.
      • Placement of paths around the gazebo encourages wandering in, out, and behind the structure.
      • Consider planting the landscape for the view from the lawn and from the gazebo; here, pretty flowerbeds offer interesting color and foliage.
      • Smaller gazebos fit neatly into bigger garden beds; this one nestles nicely between several.
      • Both outdoor furniture and a concrete pad allow for no-fuss maintenance.
    • Second Life

      A classic farm structure gets reincarnated as a gazebo.

      • With a few adjustments, a small outbuilding can also be repurposed as a gazebo. Here, a former corn crib gets a new life.
      • Placed at grade, pavers provide a pretty pattern underfoot.
      • Purple flower boxes at each "window" offer a sweet pop of color and foliage.
      • Charming details add character to a gazebo, such as the metal "shades" over the window and the winged sculpture over the door here.
      • Wood is a good gazebo standby material, but the wire frame and metal roof of this version require minimal maintenance.
    • Pretty Panorama

      A covered structure offers a scenic vista.

      • While many gazebos are placed at grade, an elevated version can take advantage of views.
      • Choose outdoor-ready couches, chairs, and tables, as well as "wet" rated lighting to furnish your gazebo.
      • A gazebo placed close to the house may be easier to wire for electricity -- a bonus if you plan lots of nighttime use.
      • Smaller gazebos may not need multiple light fixtures, but an expansive one such as the one in this gazebo requires overhead and ambient illumination.
      • Ensure an elevated gazebo has safety railings to prevent falls.
    • Under a Blue Sky

      An open metal structure defines a pretty spot for relaxing.

      • Some gazebos are for shelter, while others, such as this one, offer purely decorative elements in the landscape.
      • An overhead candlelit fixture supplies nighttime ambiance.
      • Hanging baskets define the open walls.
      • When a gazebo has no sides, use plants to stand in for walls.
      • Widely spaced pavers interspersed with grass eliminate the need for a formal floor.
    • A Bed of Roses

      A compact gazebo offers a bit of romance in location and design.

      • If candles provide the only illumination, consider adjustable height fixtures for lighting flexibility.
      • Plenty of off-the-shelf details, such as these charming, gently curved roof brackets, lend individual style to even the most basic of structures.
      • A cupola with vents offers a bit of airflow for the roof structure.
      • A smaller gazebo can supply a more intimate setting, with space just for a table and a few chairs.
      • Elevated just one step, this gazebo's separation from its surroundings gives it a sense of place in the landscape.
    • Yellow and Bright

      A cheery gazebo displays an arresting sense of style.

      • Outdoor fabric provides pattern for the cushion covers, walls, and drapes.
      • A small nook offers a storage spot for a collection of orchids.
      • A built-in bench around the perimeter eliminates the need for moveable furniture.
      • Striped flooring shaped into an octagon supplies the floor with visual interest.
      • A delicate metal ceiling light, address plaque, and cupola provide additional appealing details.
    • 10 of 11

      Open Air

      A stripped-down gazebo creates a clever endpoint to a deck.

      • The gazebo reinforces the casual style of the deck -- simple flooring planks, no railing, weathered wood.
      • Gazebos can be self-contained structures, or they can form a natural extension of a nearby deck or patio.
      • As demonstrated with this gazebo, a structure's open sides offer a chance to direct the view toward a section of the landscape.
      • If the garden is casual, a formal path to a gazebo may not make sense. Instead, use flowerbeds and stretches of grass to direct visitors to the structure.
      • Built-ins are nice, but not necessary. Here, containers filled with pretty blooms offer plenty of color.
    • 11 of 11
      Next Slideshow Xeriscaping

      Xeriscaping

      In many parts of the country, water resources are becoming scarcer. That's why it's a good idea to landscape your home using waterwise techniques. Called xeriscaping, this process will help you have a less thirsty backyard. Here's how to do it.
      Begin Slideshow »

      Related

    close
    close
    close
    close
    close

    Loading... Please wait...