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Turn a wet, poorly drained spot in your yard into a colorful landscape feature with these perennial flowers and ornamental grasses.

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Improve Poor Drainage

Follow these tips to transform a poorly drained area into an easy-care garden.

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Tips and Tricks to Keep Plants Blooming

Deadheading is a popular practice ¿ but do you know all the ways to keep flowers on your plants longer? Follow these easy tips for keeping your favorite shrubs and flowers blooming longer.

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Top Plant Picks for Late-Summer Color

Keep the color coming on strong through the end of the growing season with these easy-care, reliable annuals and perennials.

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Plan for a Gorgeous Fall Landscape

See how two great gardeners -- one on the East Coast and one on the West -- created knock-your-socks-off fall yards -- and learn how you can do the same.

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Best Plants for Rock Gardens

Transforming an unsightly slope or mound in your backyard into a colorful rock garden is easy when you chose the right plants. These amazing, low-maintenance ground huggers don't mind poor soil but do need good drainage to survive. Here's a list of our top plants for rock gardens.

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Tips for Moving Plants Indoors

Here's a handy guide for moving your favorite plants inside once the weather turns cold.

Pick a Good Spot

Many gardeners know that heartbreaking feeling that comes with autumn frosts. The end of the season does not have to mean a painful parting with plants, however. You can move many of your favorite container annuals and tropicals inside, where they'll survive as houseplants until spring.

Before you move your plants, be sure you have the right location. The majority of varieties need a bright spot (as most grow in full sun outdoors). They also like extra humidity; indoor air is typically dry and the leaves will turn brown and crispy if there's not enough moisture in it.

Although most plants prefer a cool location -- in the 60s during the day and 10 degrees lower at night -- they will tolerate warmer conditions.

Watch for Pests

A little extra care before you move the plants in will help them cope with the transition. First, check carefully for pest problems and spray if you spot any.

Acclimate Plants

Once pests are under control, acclimate your plants by putting them in a shady spot for a couple of weeks before moving them inside. When you bring them inside, cut them back slightly; this helps control size and encourages new growth that will be better adapted to life indoors. (Repeat the process in spring when you take the plants back outside, to help them acclimate to being outdoors again.)

If you want to bring a plant that was growing in the ground (versus in a container), you will need to pot it first. Choose a container with drainage holes and fill it with a potting mix designed for containers. Do not use regular garden soil. It does not drain well and can harbor insects or disease. Knock off the garden soil from the roots to discourage pests.

Winter Care Tips

Once your plants are indoors, water them enough so they do not completely dry out. Remember they do not need as much water as during the growing season. They typically will not need fertilizer, either. Think of their indoor time as a rest period.

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