The Best Flowers for Wet Soil

Turn a wet, poorly drained spot in your yard into a colorful landscape feature with these perennial flowers and ornamental grasses.

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Fall Veggies to Plant Now

Grow these cool-season vegetables and herbs to extend your garden's harvests in spring and fall. This list of vegetables includes seasonal vegetables, green vegetables, non-starchy vegetables, winter vegetables, green leafy vegetables, fall vegetables and more.

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Improve Poor Drainage

Follow these tips to transform a poorly drained area into an easy-care garden.

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Tips and Tricks to Keep Plants Blooming

Deadheading is a popular practice ¿ but do you know all the ways to keep flowers on your plants longer? Follow these easy tips for keeping your favorite shrubs and flowers blooming longer.

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Top Plant Picks for Late-Summer Color

Keep the color coming on strong through the end of the growing season with these easy-care, reliable annuals and perennials.

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Plan for a Gorgeous Fall Landscape

See how two great gardeners -- one on the East Coast and one on the West -- created knock-your-socks-off fall yards -- and learn how you can do the same.

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Best Plants for Rock Gardens

Transforming an unsightly slope or mound in your backyard into a colorful rock garden is easy when you chose the right plants. These amazing, low-maintenance ground huggers don't mind poor soil but do need good drainage to survive. Here's a list of our top plants for rock gardens.

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Lawn-Care Calendar for the South

Create a lush, green carpet in your landscape with our seasonal calendar of lawn-care tips for the South.

Spring

Stop summer weeds: Don't let annual weeds ruin the look of your lawn. Spread a pre-emergence herbicide to stop them before they sprout. Apply the pre-emergence product from mid-February to early March for best results.

Begin mowing: Start mowing your lawn as it begins to grow in mid- to late spring.

Don't let thatch build up: Thatch is a layer of old, dead grass stems that builds up on lawns. It prevents air, water, and nutrients from getting to your lawn's root system. Remove thatch before the grass starts growing in summer.

Summer

Fertilize your lawn: Warm-season lawns get hungry in the summer. Start feeding your grass as the weather warms up in late April or early May. Feed according to the fertilizer package instructions throughout the summer.

Get rid of grubs: If grubs have been a problem in your area, use a long-acting grub killer to stop. Apply this in early to late May.

Start a new lawn: Using seed, sprigs, or plugs, start lawns in the summer. Remember that the warm-season grasses that thrive in the South need plenty of water as they get established; never allow a new lawn to dry out.

Keep mowing: You're going to need to mow regularly in summer. Avoid removing more than a third of the leaf's total blade length at one time. Removing more can stress your lawn.

Aerate hard soil: Summer is also the time to loosen hard, compacted soil with an aerator. This allows air, moisture, and nutrients to reach your lawn's roots more easily.

Water as needed: Most lawns need regular watering during the summer to keep them green. On average, provide about 1 inch of water per week.

Fall

Overseed with annual ryegrass: Bermudagrass goes dormant and turns brown in the winter months, so you can overseed it with annual ryegrass. The ryegrass grows and stays green during the cooler months, then dies out once it gets hot -- just as your Bermudagrass starts turning green again.

Prevent winter weeds: Stop pesky winter weeds just like you did summer species: Use a pre-emergence herbicide from mid-October to mid-November.

Finish up mowing: Keep mowing your lawn as it slows down during the fall season. Don't let it get too long as it goes dormant.

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