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September Tips: The Pacific Northwest

September can be the driest month of the year. Keep up with watering, as well as other garden chores.

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Wait for a cool day to plant your container roses.

What Zone Are You In? -- In all but the coldest regions (Zones 5 and colder), early fall is an excellent time to plant perennials, container trees and shrubs, and roses. This month, however, it can still be hot. Do the planting on a cool, overcast, or rainy day to prevent heat stress.

What Zone Are You In?

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Watering -- September can be the driest month of the year. Remember the basics: Water in the early morning. Water the soil, not the leaves. Water deeply and occasionally rather than shallow and often.

Watering

Drought Survival for Your Lawn -- Check out our lawn drought-survival tips.

Drought Survival for Your Lawn

  • For best selection, buy bulbs as soon as you see them in stores. Keep in a cool, dry place until time for planting in October.

Repair the Lawn -- In cooler regions, September is also an excellent month to reseed and repair lawns. You'll need to water as often as daily until the seed has sprouted and established.

Repair the Lawn

  • It's also a good time to add fall color to the garden with variegated sages, euphorbias, ajugas, winter pansies, and ornamental kales and cabbages.
  • If mature plants are flopping, tie them up or use plant supports or stakes (criss-crossed like an X with ends inserted in the soil) to keep them upright and to prevent them from smothering neighboring plants.
  • Halt fertilizing of roses and perennials. It will only encourage tender new growth that will get zapped this winter.

Harvesting Vegetables -- Keep up with the harvest from your vegetable garden.

Harvesting Vegetables

Whack Your Weeds -- Although this time of year it's tempting to forget about weeding, keep up with it. There's an old saying about weeds that one year's seeding means seven years' weeding.

Whack Your Weeds

Deadheading 101 -- Even now, keep deadheading! You'll have more flowers longer, not to mention a nicer-looking garden.

Deadheading 101

  • Even though grass growth has slowed, don't let it get more than 3 inches tall.

First Frost -- In Zones 3 and colder and at high elevations, your first frost is likely to come this month. Stay tuned to the television and newspaper forecasts to find out exactly when. Prolong the growing season by throwing a sheet or other non-plastic material over your annuals and vegetables. In fact, for vegetables, you can cover them indefinitely with any very light landscape fabric and anchor the corners with bricks or stones. It lets in sun and rain, but prevents light frosts from doing any damage.

First Frost

Bird Feeding -- Fall is the time overwintering birds establish their food sources. If you haven't already, put out your bird feeding equipment.

Bird Feeding

Fall Garden Guide -- For more information, check out our fall garden guide.

Fall Garden Guide

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