Best Early Spring Flowers for the Pacific Northwest

Celebrate the first days of spring in the Northwest with these early bloomers.

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These earliest-to-bloom flowers lend hope that spring is on its way.

Flowering currant (Ribes sanguineum) has showy pink blossoms that provide early nectar for overwintering hummingbirds. Zones 6-8

Corkscrew hazel (Corylus avellana 'Contorta') is also known as Harry Lauder's walking stick. Its twisted branches drip long golden catkins in early spring. Zones 3-9

Clematis armandii is an evergreen vine unsurpassed for its beauty and sweet fragrance. Zones 7-9

Helleborus carpet woodlands in late winter with saucer-shape flowers in colors from cream through pink to purple. Zones 4-9

Donkey tail spurge (Euphorbia myrsinites) sends up bright chartreuse blooms as an early show of color. Zones 5-8

Lungwort (Pulmonaria selections) is one of the first perennials to bloom, with bright flowers and beguilingly spotted leaves. Zones 4-8

Wallflower (Erysimum spp.) will lure you out to the garden on even the chilliest days. 'Apricot Twist' heats up the garden with cheerful orange blooms. Zones 7-9

Tulip (Tulipa 'Prinses Irene') is one of the first tulips of spring. This heirloom produces single, orange flowers with contrasting purple markings that resemble flames. Zones 4-6

Crown imperials (Fritillaria imperialis) look more like an exotic flock of parrots than flowers. Tall stems emerging from these bulbs produce bell-shape, pendant flowers. Zones 5-9

Learn more about hellebores.

Learn more about spurges.

Learn more about lungwort.

Learn more about wallflower.

Learn more about tulips.

Learn more about crown imperials.

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