The Best Flowers for Wet Soil

Turn a wet, poorly drained spot in your yard into a colorful landscape feature with these perennial flowers and ornamental grasses.

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Fall Veggies to Plant Now

Grow these cool-season vegetables and herbs to extend your garden's harvests in spring and fall. This list of vegetables includes seasonal vegetables, green vegetables, non-starchy vegetables, winter vegetables, green leafy vegetables, fall vegetables and more.

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Improve Poor Drainage

Follow these tips to transform a poorly drained area into an easy-care garden.

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Tips and Tricks to Keep Plants Blooming

Deadheading is a popular practice ¿ but do you know all the ways to keep flowers on your plants longer? Follow these easy tips for keeping your favorite shrubs and flowers blooming longer.

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Top Plant Picks for Late-Summer Color

Keep the color coming on strong through the end of the growing season with these easy-care, reliable annuals and perennials.

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Plan for a Gorgeous Fall Landscape

See how two great gardeners -- one on the East Coast and one on the West -- created knock-your-socks-off fall yards -- and learn how you can do the same.

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Best Plants for Rock Gardens

Transforming an unsightly slope or mound in your backyard into a colorful rock garden is easy when you chose the right plants. These amazing, low-maintenance ground huggers don't mind poor soil but do need good drainage to survive. Here's a list of our top plants for rock gardens.

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Best Plants for Butterflies for the Northeast

These plants promise to attract a variety of butterflies to your garden.

One of the best ways to encourage butterflies in your garden is to grow food plants for caterpillars. Adult butterflies spend their short lives looking for mates and laying eggs. Where better to congregate than in a garden where their offspring can hatch and grow safely to adulthood? Nectar-rich flowers feed them while they search, so plan your garden to satisfy both needs.

Violets, pansies, and Johnny-jump-ups feed the young of many fritillary species. Drifts of these hardy, sweetly scented flowers attract the dramatic, 3-inch-wide great spangled fritillary as well as smaller meadow fritillary and their intricately patterned relatives. New England aster (Aster novae-angliae) and related species host the caterpillars of butterflies such as clouded sulfurs, checkered whites, and pearl crescents. Many adult butterflies, especially the monarch, depend on its abundant nectar for energy in late summer and early autumn. Other important late-season nectar sources include zinnia, marigold (Tagetes spp.), goldenrod (Solidago spp.), Joe Pye weed (Eupatorium spp.), and sedum (Sedum spectabile).

To encourage the widest variety of butterflies, let your garden go wild around the edges; leave room for wild grasses, clover, nettles (Urtica spp.), willows, sassafras, and milkweed (Asclepias spp.). Thickets, marshes, meadows, and wooded edges provide the rich habitats that butterflies call home.

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