The Best Flowers for Wet Soil

Turn a wet, poorly drained spot in your yard into a colorful landscape feature with these perennial flowers and ornamental grasses.

View Slideshow

Fall Veggies to Plant Now

Grow these cool-season vegetables and herbs to extend your garden's harvests in spring and fall. This list of vegetables includes seasonal vegetables, green vegetables, non-starchy vegetables, winter vegetables, green leafy vegetables, fall vegetables and more.

View Slideshow

Improve Poor Drainage

Follow these tips to transform a poorly drained area into an easy-care garden.

See More

Tips and Tricks to Keep Plants Blooming

Deadheading is a popular practice ¿ but do you know all the ways to keep flowers on your plants longer? Follow these easy tips for keeping your favorite shrubs and flowers blooming longer.

View Video

Top Plant Picks for Late-Summer Color

Keep the color coming on strong through the end of the growing season with these easy-care, reliable annuals and perennials.

View Slideshow

Plan for a Gorgeous Fall Landscape

See how two great gardeners -- one on the East Coast and one on the West -- created knock-your-socks-off fall yards -- and learn how you can do the same.

View Slideshow

Best Plants for Rock Gardens

Transforming an unsightly slope or mound in your backyard into a colorful rock garden is easy when you chose the right plants. These amazing, low-maintenance ground huggers don't mind poor soil but do need good drainage to survive. Here's a list of our top plants for rock gardens.

View Slideshow
Popular in Gardening

Best Plants for Attracting Birds in the Northeast

Welcome feathered friends to your backyard with these bird-friendly plants.

A family of Gray Catbirds squabbles noisily in their nest in a clump of elderberry bushes (Sambucus) out by the road. In the silvery branches of a serviceberry (Amelanchier) near the porch, a small flock of Cedar Waxwings swoops in to grab a few juicy purple berries before moving on to the blueberry bushes (Vaccinium). Chickadees and nuthatches hang from the branches of the tall, white spruce (Picea glauca) windbreak, picking insects from between the needles and prizing seeds from last winter's cones. Robins stuff their beaks with pagoda dogwood berries (Cornus alternifolia) and wild strawberries to feed their fledglings. Out in the garden, a vibrant goldfinch clings to the dried stem of a black-eyed Susan (Rudbeckia hirta), looking for seeds.

Click here for a tour of a beautiful Northeast garden.

Native plants do more than feed the birds; they're versatile and attractive landscape plants, too. Cornell University offers more bird-friendly tips and plant suggestions at birds.cornell.edu. Ready to take your landscape to the next level? Create a Certified Wildlife Habitat through the National Wildlife Foundation program, nwf.org.

close
close
close
close
close

Loading... Please wait...