10 Ways to Conquer Your Fear of Gardening

You might not believe it, but you were born with a green thumb. It may have gone untended for a while, but it's there waiting for you to nudge it awake. Put away your theory of being a plant killer, that anything dies under your care. Forget those nagging thoughts of where your garden will live or when you'll find the time, it's there somewhere. It doesn't have to cost a fortune and you'll get more than you give. So, here are 10 tips for conquering your fear of gardening:

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Gardening Tips for Renters

Want to bring more green to your house or apartment? Using a few easy, inexpensive techniques, <a href="http://www.thehorticult.com/">The Horticult</a> shows how you can garden like you own the place -- without risking your security deposit. You don't have to own your home to create a garden that reflects your personal style. Grow your favorite plants and create an inspired landscape -- or patio, interior, or balcony -- using these fun, low-commitment methods. (Although you might want to check with your landlord about the larger projects!) And if you move, you can take it all with you. These 10 tips for renters will give your garden a new lease on life.

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Summer Checklist

Summer is a gardener¿s busiest season. If you¿re short on time or not sure what to do, follow this easy summer gardening checklist to keep your lawn and garden in great shape all season long.

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Drought-Tolerant Grasses

Drought! The word itself strikes fear into the hearts of gardeners everywhere. Scarce water resources, especially in hard hit areas such as California and Texas, are making it almost impossible to maintain traditional style lawns. That's why many people are replacing their lawns with groundcovers and native plants. But for those who want a lush green lawn, here are some less-thirsty options.

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How to Improve Garden Soil

Many homeowners inherit bad garden soil ¿ but you don¿t have to live with it! Learn how to get the best garden soil possible through amendments, composting, and more.

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Top Shade Perennials

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Landscape Ideas

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Popular in Gardening

September Gardening Tips for the Midwest

With the heat letting up, roses resume blooming, late-summer perennials kick in, and the vegetable garden outdoes itself.

USDA Zone Maps -- In all but the coldest regions (Zones 5 and colder), early fall is an excellent time to plant perennials, container trees and shrubs, and roses. This month, however, it can still be hot. Do the planting on a cool, overcast, or rainy day to prevent heat stress.
See the USDA hardiness zone map.

Keep Your Lawn Looking Good
In cooler regions (Zones 6 and colder), September also is an excellent month to reseed and repair lawns. You'll need to water daily until the seed has sprouted and established. In warmer regions where daily highs are still well and regularly into the 80s F, wait to plant grass seed until October in warmer regions when there are cooler temperatures and rain.
Learn how to renovate your lawn.

Even though grass growth has slowed, don't let it get more than three inches tall. Apply a fertilizer and broad-leaf weed control to lawns this month. You can buy them in one formula, known as a weed-and-feed combination. Choose, if possible, one designed for fall application.

Tend to the Garden
If mature plants are flopping, tie them up or use plant supports or stakes (crisscrossed like an X with ends inserted in the soil) to keep them upright and to prevent them from smothering neighboring plants.

Halt fertilizing of roses and perennials. It will only encourage tender new growth that will get zapped this winter.

Keep deadheading! You'll have more flowers longer, not to mention a nicer-looking garden.
See how to deadhead.

Although this time of year it's tempting to forget about weeding, it's worth the effort to keep up with it!

In Zones 3 and colder and at high elevations, your first frost is likely to come this month. Stay tuned to the television and newspaper forecasts to find out exactly when.

Prolong the growing season by throwing a sheet or other nonplastic material over your annuals and vegetables. In fact, for vegetables, you can cover them indefinitely with any very light landscape fabric and anchor the corners with bricks or stones. It lets in sun and rain, but prevents light frosts from doing any damage.
Learn more about harvesting vegetables.

Attract birds to your garden by establishing their food sources now.
See ways to make your garden more appealing.

Deadheading Your Garden

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