The Best Flowers for Wet Soil

Turn a wet, poorly drained spot in your yard into a colorful landscape feature with these perennial flowers and ornamental grasses.

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Fall Veggies to Plant Now

Grow these cool-season vegetables and herbs to extend your garden's harvests in spring and fall. This list of vegetables includes seasonal vegetables, green vegetables, non-starchy vegetables, winter vegetables, green leafy vegetables, fall vegetables and more.

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Improve Poor Drainage

Follow these tips to transform a poorly drained area into an easy-care garden.

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Tips and Tricks to Keep Plants Blooming

Deadheading is a popular practice ¿ but do you know all the ways to keep flowers on your plants longer? Follow these easy tips for keeping your favorite shrubs and flowers blooming longer.

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Top Plant Picks for Late-Summer Color

Keep the color coming on strong through the end of the growing season with these easy-care, reliable annuals and perennials.

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Plan for a Gorgeous Fall Landscape

See how two great gardeners -- one on the East Coast and one on the West -- created knock-your-socks-off fall yards -- and learn how you can do the same.

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Best Plants for Rock Gardens

Transforming an unsightly slope or mound in your backyard into a colorful rock garden is easy when you chose the right plants. These amazing, low-maintenance ground huggers don't mind poor soil but do need good drainage to survive. Here's a list of our top plants for rock gardens.

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Rose Planting Guide

Success in growing perfect roses lies not in the fussy details, but in the mastery of a few basic principles.

Growing beautiful roses starts with proper planting.

You'd never guess that such lovely flowers could spring from anything as homely as a bare-root rose. This awkward assemblage of stubby, thorny canes and wiry roots is poised for quick growth, making bare-roots the first choice of experienced gardeners. Look for dormant plants, their roots swaddled in plastic, in garden centers or nursery catalogs. Bare-root roses settle in with a minimum of transplant shock, then swiftly move on to the business of cranking out flowers.

Soak, clip, and trim your stems before planting.

1. On planting day, refresh the roots in a bucket of water while you dig the planting hole. An hour-long soaking plumps up shriveled roots.

2. Clip off damaged roots (this one is cracked). Shorten roots that are too long to fit in the planting hole without bending.

3. Some rose sellers trim the stems, or canes, for you. More likely, you'll need to prune them yourself. Remove the broken ends of canes, canes with blackened or diseased spots, and twiggy growth. Leave three to five sturdy canes in an open-centered arrangement. Cut back any extra-long canes so all are about the same length. Don't worry about making a pruning mistake; it's hard to go wrong.

4. Timing is crucial for bare-root planting: in most areas bare-root roses should be planted in early spring before their leaves unfurl; where temperatures rarely dip below 20 degrees, winter planting is best. If you can't plant a bare-root rose right away, keep its roots moist and cool. An alternative to bare-root roses -- container-grown or "potted" roses -- can be planted any time they're available. Potted roses are a convenient way to extend the planting season.

Download our helpful chart on roses for every purpose. (Downloading requires Adobe Acrobat software.)

Roses for every purpose

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