A Gallery of Garden Shed Ideas

Add storage to your garden with personalized style. Our gallery of garden shed ideas shows you how.

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Gardening Tips for Renters

Want to bring more green to your house or apartment? Using a few easy, inexpensive techniques, <a href="http://www.thehorticult.com/">The Horticult</a> shows how you can garden like you own the place -- without risking your security deposit. You don't have to own your home to create a garden that reflects your personal style. Grow your favorite plants and create an inspired landscape -- or patio, interior, or balcony -- using these fun, low-commitment methods. (Although you might want to check with your landlord about the larger projects!) And if you move, you can take it all with you. These 10 tips for renters will give your garden a new lease on life.

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Editors' Picks: Top Rabbit-Resistant Plants

We've pulled together a gallery of some of our favorite plants that rabbits avoid in our gardens.

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Summer Garden Maintenance Checklist

Summer is a gardener¿s busiest season. If you¿re short on time or not sure what to do, follow this easy summer gardening checklist to keep your lawn and garden in great shape all season long.

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Throw a Garden Party

Greet the season with friends, flowers, and ice cream floats! Featuring pretty paper blooms and a blushing peach punch, this lovely garden gathering will have you celebrating summer in style.

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Add Interest to Your Yard with a Pergola

Create a landscape that looks good all year long with these creative ideas for incorporating a pergola into your yard.

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Make a Succulent Wreath

Succulent wreaths made from succulent plants require little water and are a great way to decorate your outdoor spaces.

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Popular in Gardening

Planting Perennials in Patios, Paths & Walls

Embed perennials in your existing structures to liven up the look of your garden.

Structural elements such as patios, stone walls, and garden paths help set the tone or mood for a landscape. The English refer to these structures as the "bones" of their beds and borders. Creative gardeners often use these architectural elements as planting opportunities, allowing the flowers to decorate underlying structures.

Perennials that have evolved in rocky, mountainous regions are popularly known as alpine or rock garden plants. Many can grow easily in the cracks and nooks of stone walls such as some species of rockcress (Aubrieta), garden pinks (Dianthus), and soapworts (Saponaria). The flowers of these colorful plants naturally sprawl over stone walls while their roots flourish in cool crevices away from the sun's glare. Just half-fill with good garden soil, tap in your plant root, and then pack in the remaining dirt.

Many perennials are particularly lovely when carefully placed along a path. Take care to ensure that they do not overgrow the pathway.

One charming way to decorate a garden path is place fragrant herbs in selected spots. As they are stepped on, the herbs release their pungent fragrance. Perennials that can withstand such abuse include chamomile (Chamaemelum nobile), creeping mint (Mentha requienii), and various thymes, such as lemon thyme (Thymus x citriodorus) and caraway thyme (T. herba-barona). When creating your garden path, leave open spaces for these shallow-rooted plants and make sure that the drainage is excellent.

Planting in a Dry Stone Wall

Step 1

1. Remove a stone to open up a suitable planting space when planting perennials in a dry stone wall.

Step 2

2. With a long-bladed trowel, scoop out the soil from the planting pocket and mix it with compost or other soil amendments.

Step 3

3. Position a small plant, such as this creeping sedum, in the hole and fill in around the roots with the improved soil mix.

Step 4

4. Replace the stone, tapping it into place with the handle of the trowel. Water with a fine spray over the stone and adjacent plant.

Planting in a Patio or Path

Step 1

1. Small plants soften the look of your patio or path. Dig a planting hole between flagstones or remove a brick from the structure.

Step 2

2. Mix a trowelful of good-quality soil into the bottom of the hole. Remove the plant form its container, keeping the root ball intact.

Step 3

3. Set the plant in the hold and fill in around the roots with enough ordinary soil or compost-enriched soil to anchor the plant.

Step 4

4. When you have finished planting, water thoroughly, but with a fine spray that will not dislodge the new plants.

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