Best Lavender Flowers for Your Garden

Lavender flowers add a cooling touch to the garden. Lavender pairs especially well with blues and pinks, as well as soft yellows and pastel oranges. Check out some of our favorite lavender flowers.

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    Liatris

    (Liatris)

    Add vertical pop to your garden with the clustered lavender flowers of blazing star. It's also ideal for attracting butterflies and hummingbirds.

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    Pincushion Flower

    (Scabiosa)

    Bring some charm to your garden with the reblooming flower power of pincushion flower. Plant it in groups of three or five for the greatest impact.

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    Russian Sage

    (Perovskia atriplicifolia)

    Russian sage has a lot to offer -- elegant lavender flowers among fragrant, silvery foliage that strikes a pose throughout all seasons. Plant Russian sage in areas where it's allowed to grow freely, or choose dwarf varieties that don't require staking.

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    Lilac

    (Syringa)

    Old-fashioned lilacs are back in style! And with so many varieties, you can't go wrong. Some of our favorites include 'President Lincoln', 'Sensation', and 'Pocahontas'. Plant lilac for privacy or as a fragrant focal point in your garden.

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    Blue Chiffon Rose of Sharon

    (Blue Chiffon Hibiscus syriacus)

    We all love hibiscus for its tropical flair, continual blooms, and graceful stature. Pair those qualities with double lavender blooms, and you've got a win-win for your garden!

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    'Velocity Baby Blue' Viola

    (Viola williamsii 'Velocity Baby Blue')

    Pansies are great to add an extra punch of color to your garden during the cooler seasons. Plant 'Velocity Baby Blue' for a beautiful variegation between lavender and white -- sure to fit in well with any landscape.

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    Clematis

    Clematis 'Ramona'

    Plant this climbing perennial near a tree or shrub and it will entwine itself through the branches. Protect the sensitive clematis crown from diseases and damage by planting it just above the soil line.

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    Flowering Onion

    (Allium senescens)

    The allium grows from a bulb and reaches heights of 3 to 24 inches. Lily stalks make strong living supports for the taller, top-heavy allium stems.

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    Catmint

    'Bath's Pink' Dianthus, catmint (Nepeta x faassenii)

    This perennial duet blooms in early summer. Both plants have ground-hugging habits and do well in dry soils.

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    Petunia

    Multiflora petunia

    Fertilize this showy annual often, and cut back leggy plants in midsummer to promote continuous cascades of fragrant flowers.

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    Aster

    Aster x frikartii

    Asters provide late-season shades of lavender in the garden. This compact variety doesn't need staking.

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    Foxglove

    Rose, foxglove (Digitalis spp.)

    Biennial foxglove grows one year and blooms the next.

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    Iris

    Bearded iris (Iris x germanica)

    The iris lasts for decades in the garden. Dividing the rhizomes every few years keeps plants vigorous.

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    Lavender

    Lavender (Lavandula) Artemisia, cardoon (Cynara cardunculus)

    Mediterranean natives such as these perennials fare best in rocky soil and a sunny location.

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    Larkspur

    Larkspur (Consolida ambigua)

    Sow annual larkspur seeds once; the plants will self-sow and return on their own in subsequent years.

  • Next Slideshow Best Blue Flowers for Your Garden

    Best Blue Flowers for Your Garden

    Blue flowers add a cool touch to the landscape. Get the names of blue flowers and learn how to grow different types of blue flowers in your garden.
    Begin Slideshow »
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