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Best Blue Flowers for Your Garden

Blue flowers add a cool touch to the landscape. Get the names of blue flowers and learn how to grow different types of blue flowers in your garden.

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    • Blue Hydrangea

      A big, sky blue hydrangea flower is absolutely breathtaking. Get your bigleaf hydrangeas to turn clear, sky blue by increasing the acidity of the soil. Adding soil sulfur is one way to do this.

      Blue Flower Tip: Bigleaf hydrangeas can be shy bloomers. Most flower on last-year's growth, so if you need to prune them, do so right after they finish flowering. And look for newer varieties such as Endless Summer, which produce flowers on both new and old growth.

      Name: Hydrangea macrophylla selections

      Growing Conditions: Morning sun and afternoon shade with moist, well-drained soil that's rich in organic matter. Don't let bigleaf hydrangeas get too dry.

      Size: To 7 feet tall and wide, depending on variety

      Zones: 4-9, depending on the variety

      Grow it with: Blue bigleaf hydrangeas look stunning when paired with white-flowering varieties such as 'Annabelle' hydrangea or oakleaf hydrangea.

    • Perennial Geranium

      There are lots of garden-worthy perennial blue flowers, but 'Rozanne' is one of the best. This top-notch perennial flowers from June to frost, producing a nearly endless supply of violet-blue flowers.

      Plant Name: Rozanne Geranium 'Gerwat'

      Growing Conditions: Full sun or part shade and moist, well-drained soil

      Size: To 2 feet tall and 3 feet wide

      Zones: 4-8

      Plant it with: Because the geranium starts flowering in early summer, pair it with spring-blooming bulbs such as grape hyacinth, blue crocus, and white daffodils.

    • Delphinium

      Delphiniums offer some of the truest-blue flowers in the garden. In many areas, the plants are a bit fussy (delphiniums prefer regions with cool summers) -- though many gardeners find these regal flowers well worth the extra effort.

      Here's a hint: Stake taller delphinium varieties to keep the blue flowers from toppling over in the wind. Grow them in soil that's rich in organic matter. In poor soil, fertilize them with a general-purpose product to keep them looking their best.

      Plant Name: Delphinium selections

      Growing Conditions: Full sun to part shade and moist, well-drained soil

      Size: To 6 feet tall and 1 foot wide, depending on type

      Zones: 3-7, depending on type

      Grow it with: Blue-flowering dwarf delphiniums such as 'Butterfly Blue' or 'Summer Nights' look fantastic with the yellow blooms of Coreopsis 'Moonbeam' or Gaillardia 'Fanfare'.

    • Brunnera

      A gorgeous but underused shade-garden plant, brunnera produces sprays of pale blue flowers in spring.

      Here's a hint: The heart-shaped leaves are rather plain, so look for variegated selections, such as the one shown here, to increase the season of interest. 'Jack Frost' is one of the most popular varieties; its blue flowers are set off by silver-splashed foliage.

      Plant Name: Brunnera macrophylla

      Growing Conditions: Shade and moist, well-drained soil

      Size: To 2 feet tall and wide

      Zones: 3-7

      Plant it with: The springtime flowers look fantastic paired with white or yellow daffodils or with silvery Japanese painted fern.

    • Grape Hyacinth

      A beautiful spring-flowering bulb, grape hyacinths produce clusters of blue flowers in midspring. Look around and you can also find varieties that bear purple, white, or yellow flowers, too.

      Plant Name: Muscari selections

      Growing Conditions: Sun or shade and well-drained soil

      Size: To 8 inches tall and 3 inches wide

      Zones: 4-8

      Plant it with: Yellow daffodils are a classic choice, but you can extend the season by planting them with crocus and summer-blooming perennials such as blue-flowering columbine.

    • Clematis

      Clematis bloom in a range of color, but the true blue-flowering varieties, such as 'Crystal Fountain', 'Ice Blue', or 'Arabella' are among the most charming. Grow these vines on a trellis or in a small tree or large shrub.

      Plant Name: Clematis selections

      Growing Conditions: Full sun and moist, well-drained soil

      Size: Most clematis climb to about 12 feet, but some can reach more than 25 feet.

      Zones: 3-9, depending on type

      Grow it with: A classic way to grow clematis is to combine them with climbing roses. Create contrast by planting a blue-flowering clematis with yellow rose such as 'Graham Thomas Climbing' or a white type such as 'Climbing Iceberg'.

    • Bluestar

      Bluestar, as you might guess, is a perfect pick for blue flowers. A great plant you've probably never heard of, bluestar deserves a lot more attention in the garden. It produces clusters of clear blue flowers in late spring. It's also heat, drought, deer, and rabbit resistant. Plus, the foliage turns a beautiful shade of yellow at the end of the season.

      Plant Name: Amsonia tabernaemontana

      Growing Conditions: Full sun or part shade and well-drained soil

      Size: To 2 feet tall and wide

      Zones: 3-9

      Plant it with: Columbines are perfect companions for bluestar. Create a harmonious color scheme by planting blue- or white-flowering columbines; create contrast with yellow varieties.

    • Lead Plant

      Lead plant is an aggressively spreading ground cover that puts on a show at the end of the season with its sky blue flowers and rich red fall foliage.

      Here's a hint: Lead plant grows more slowly in shade, but still blooms well.

      Plant Name: Ceratostigma plumbaginoides

      Growing Conditions: Sun or shade and well-drained soil

      Size: To 1 foot tall and 2 feet wide

      Zones: 5-9

      Plant it with: Create a bold, end-of-the-season display by pairing blue-flowering lead plant with yellow chrysanthemums or white asters.

    • Bellflower

      Bellflowers are charming plants often used in cottage gardens. Most have starry or bell-shaped flowers in blue, violet, pink, or white. Many of the longer-stemmed varieties are great cut flowers. Dwarf types, such as the 'Pearl Deep Blue' are good groundcovers.

      Plant Name: Campanula selections

      Growing Conditions: Full sun or part shade and moist, well-drained soil

      Size: To 3 feet tall and 2 feet wide, depending on type

      Zones: 3-9, depending on type

      Plant it with: Bellflowers are prefect companions for blue pincushion flowers (Scabiosa). Bonus: Both are great for cutting!

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      Salvia

      Salvia varieties have become garden champions for their heat and drought resistance, as well as the fact that even hungry deer and bunnies tend to leave them alone.

      For true blue flowers, look for Salvia azurea or S. patens. Other types, such as 'May Night' or 'Blue Mound' are more violet blue.

      Plant Name: Salvia selections

      Growing Conditions: Full sun and well-drained soil

      Size: To 5 feet tall and wide, depending on type

      Zones: 3-9, depending on type

      Grow it with: Blue salvias look wonderful with penstemon varieties, which are also heat and drought resistant.

    • 11 of 14

      Balloon Flower

      An easy-to-grow perennial, balloon flower offers puffy, balloon-shape buds that open to beautiful blue, pink, or white star-shaped blooms for several weeks in summer.

      Plant Name: Platycodon grandiflorus

      Plant Name: Full sun and well-drained soil

      Size: To 2 feet tall and 1 foot wide

      Zones: 4-9

      Grow it with: The lilac-pink flowers of 'Appleblossom' yarrow (Achillea) or gaura are a perfect complement to blue balloon flowers.

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      Aster

      Asters are one of the last plants to bloom in many gardens. Enjoy their red, purple, pink, white, or blue flowers in the garden or as long-lasting cut flowers.

      Plant Name: Aster selections

      Growing Conditions: Full sun and well-drained soil

      Size: To 5 feet tall and 3 feet wide

      Zones: 3-9, depending on type

      Plant it with: Goldenrod and mums are two perfect partners for blue asters.

    • 13 of 14

      Morning Glory

      Loved by generations of gardeners, the traditional morning glory offers saucer-shape sky blue flowers. Other varieties bear blooms in bright pink, bold red, purple, and white. This vigorous vine is easy to grow from seed and can self-seed prolifically in situations where it's happy.

      Here's a hint: Morning glories can take a couple of months to start flowering after you plant the seeds. Make sure they're in full sun and don't fertilize them too much to get them to flower faster.

      Plant Name: Ipomoea tricolor

      Growing Conditions: Full sun and well-drained soil

      Size: Climbs to 12 feet tall or more

      Zones: Annual

      Grow it with: Blue and yellow flowers are a no-fail combination, so try yellow black-eyed Susan vine (Thunbergia alata) or yellow Spanish flag (Ipomoea lobata).

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      Next Slideshow Best Silver-Leaf Plants for Your Garden

      Best Silver-Leaf Plants for Your Garden

      Plants that have silvery foliage are some of the most valuable in the landscape because they look good with anything. Silver helps tone down bold, hot reds, yellows, and oranges, yet harmonizes with soft blues, pinks, and whites. Here are some of our favorite silver plants.
      Begin Slideshow »

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