Southern Arizona Wildflowers

Katie Ketelsen

There are no snakes in this grass

Ever since I was a child I’ve been fascinated with snake grass (also called horsetail, or Equisetum hymale) thanks to my babysitter who showed me how to disassemble each section and carefully snap them back together {also…the blades worked really well to whip at my little brother}.

But there is something more you should know about snake grass….she spreads. Like crazy. And will best serve your landscape if she was contained or left to flourish in her natural habitat.

Cleverly this homeowner notched out a piece of sidewalk for the plant to soften the dreary look of their mailbox.

In addition, the homeowner planted snake grass along her foundation–so the plant is still contained by the front sidewalk. The grass complements the modern, sleek characteristics of the house while providing an unique, low maintenance element.

Beyond your landscape, snake grass works well in wetlands–waterways, ditches, etc–to soak up some of the water and choke out unsightly weeds, similar to how cattails perform. Or use it for a filler within your cut flower bouquets. However you interject snake grass in your garden, please be mindful of its growing habit and plant wisely.

If you’ve grown this grass before–tell me about your experience–how you used it–how you contained it–or how you had fun with it!

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