bromeliad

Whitney Curtis

5 Easy Indoor Plants

Since it’s National Indoor Plant Week this week, I thought I’d show you a few easy indoor plants to inspire you to add some greenery to your home. I have a bunch of indoor plants around my house, they really do add depth and life to any room – and they purify the air too! Below are my top five picks for indoor plants, as well as light and water requirements. And here are a few more houseplant suggestions.

 

Maidenhair Fern

Light:  Low light
Watering:  High humidity and consistent moisture (I water mine daily!)
More info on Maidenhair fern here.

national indoor plant week

Philodendron “Orange Prince”

Light:  Low light
Watering:  Moderately moist soil, water once or twice a week

philodendron national indoor plant week

Pachira Aquatica (aka The Money Tree!)

Light:  Bright light, no direct sun
Watering:  Moist soil, high humidity

pachira aquatica money plant national indoor plant week

 

Aphelandra (aka Zebra Plant)

Light:  Bright light, no direct sun
Watering:  High humidity, moist soil (Don’t let the soil dry out!)
More houseplants with fantastic foliage here.

aphelandra national indoor plant week

Bromeliad

Light:  Medium light
Watering:  Moist soil, but tolerant if you forget every now and then. (You can water into the stem where the leaves form a little cup at the base, above the soil. It’s actually a good idea to keep some water in that “cup.”)

bromeliad national indoor plant week

 

 


Denny Schrock

indoor plant projects add beauty

If you’re ready for spring to arrive, but the weather isn’t quite cooperating, why not plan and plant an indoor garden project? During a photo shoot last week for an upcoming book on indoor gardening, I completed several projects featuring bromeliads and a couple involving converted indoor fountains. Use your imagination to come up with unique containers for terrariums and dish gardens. The results will enliven your indoor living spaces and help bridge the time until you can dig in the garden outdoors.

This former slate fountain now houses 'Bright Star' dieffenbachia and 'Brasil' philodendron. 'Millenium' variegated English ivy trails from the top of the fountain.

This wreath of air plants (Tillandsia spp.) is easy to make with a double-wire wreath ring, a hot glue gun, a collection of air plants, and a wreath hanger.

A former slate waterfall fountain cradles air plants (Tillandsia spp.) at each level. The plants need only water and bright light to thrive.

These air plants (Tillandsia spp.) were glued to a piece of wood and propped up in a tall vase that serves as a terrarium. The glass marbles prevent the stick from shifting.

Earth stars (Cryptanthus bivittatus) are terrestrial bromeliads. Here they're planted with moss and decorated with glass marbles in a shallow microwave baking pan.


Denny Schrock

bromeliads for valentine’s day

Bromeliads are easy-care indoor plants that pack a punch of color for months on end. Rather than giving your valentine flowers with fleeting color, consider giving a lasting gift of one of these beauties. (While you’re at it, pick up one for yourself too!)

All that these undemanding plants require is bright light and occasional watering. The varieties that form cuplike rosettes make watering a snap. Simply fill the “cup” with water, allowing a bit extra to drip down to the soil. Types with scaly silvery foliage (sometimes called air plants) thrive with twice-weekly misting or dunking.

Because they are tropical in origin, bromeliads appreciate comfortable room-temperature conditions. You can move them outdoors to a shaded location for the summer, but protect them from frost.

'Valentina' is a new variety of guzmania, appropriately named for gift giving to your sweetheart. Its combination of green straplike leaves, bright red bracts, and tiny white flowers is stunning.

Blushing bromeliad (Neoregelia carolinae 'Tricolor') develops a reddish pink blush on its green and white striped leaves when it blooms. The flowers are often hidden in the plant's vase, but the colorful foliage steals the show anyway.

Silver vase plant (Aechmea fasciata) pushes up a starburst of pink bracts and small purplish blue flowers from its silvery vase of foliage.

Pink quill (Tillandsia cyanea) is an air plant bromeliad. Its bright pink bracts remain even after its purple flowers fade.

Earth star (Cryptanthus bivittatus) makes a sculptural statement in a mixed planter. Its cream, rose, and green stripes attract attention.


Denny Schrock

Trends in indoor gardening

The Tropical Plant Industry Expo is the place to go to see what’s hot in indoor gardening. The fact that it’s held in southern Florida in mid-January, is another incentive to attend! Trends that I saw this year include a resurgence in the popularity of terrariums and dish gardens. But these aren’t simply a return to mass-produced fad gardens from the 1970s. Modern mini-landscapes have more style and individuality. Often they’re displayed in unique containers or feature sculptural plants. The emphasis is on tough, easy-care plants such as succulents and bromeliads. Here are some examples that I saw at this year’s Expo.

The ribbed glass on this terrarium adds a unique perspective, resembling a pumpkin. It makes a great centerpiece.

The ceramic base on this terrarium hides the soil and root zone while displaying the foliage clearly.

Put that cupcake holder to use displaying begonias, ferns, peperomias, nerve plants, and miniature palms.

Spikes of maroon Dracaena marginata explode from a bed of heavily patterned peacock plant (Maranta) in this combo.

These earth stars (Cryptanthus), a type of bromeliad, look other-worldly when displayed on a pedestal.

Echeverias, kalanchoe, and peperomia team to create amazing texture and color in this succulent dish garden.