Everyday Gardeners

Plant. Grow. Live.

Posts by Katie Ketelsen

3 Knock-Your-Spring-Socks-Off Bulb Combinations

If you’re looking for first-of-the-spring blooms, you have to plant bulbs. And you have to get them in the ground this fall! I understand how overwhelming it might be to decide which bulbs to pair together — there are so many options! I get it. Hopefully, I can help by sharing three of my favorite bulb combinations.


When I see white and purple together in the garden, it seems so fresh, so crisp, and so refreshing, especially after a long winter. It’s probably my ultimate bulb-combo recommendation. There are several different varieties of daffodils and tulips, see which ones suit might your fancy in our plant encyclopedia: Daffodils,  Tulips.

Looking for more ways to pair white and purple? Get design ideas here.


I’ve always thought the idea of planting bulbs in your lawn for a blanket of spring blooms was clever. Someday I’ll implement this technique with fragrant grape hyacinth and crocus. It really isn’t that hard. See how here.  Also, find out which grape hyacinths are our favorites and learn more about growing crocus.

Do you have bulbs planted in your lawn? I’d love to hear what varieties — and any tips you’ve learned.

Bold Partners

Sometimes you have the desire to make a statement, turn heads in the neighborhood, and that requires a bold combo. Crown imperial and parrot tulips top my list for a crowd-pleaser. Not only are they unique bloomers, their color really pops in the garden. Learn more about crown imperial and hybrid tulips from our plant encyclopedia.


Do you have a favorite bulb combination? Share with us!

3 Mystifying Tulips You Have to Have

I’m truly a plant geek at heart. I get giddy at the thought of new plant varieties. I get anxious at the end of an Iowa winter, awaiting the first sign of green. That’s why I plant spring-blooming bulbs. While it’s almost tedious to have to plant them in the fall (I’ve been tending to the garden all year now, I’m ready for a break!), I understand it’s a necessary chore to help cure my inevitable cabin fever come spring.

Recently, Longfield Gardens shared with me a series of tulips that have me completely mystified. A particular type of tulip that has me as giddy as a school girl in a candy store. A variety of tulip you have to have — above all other varieties. Are you intrigued yet?

{dramatic pause}

Have you heard of tulips that change color as their bloom matures?


{happy dance}

Bashfully, I admit, I had not heard of such a thing! And naturally, I have to have them. They’re like a two-for-one special: Early blooms bring one color and as the flower ages, you get another!

Get your trowels ready folks, your garden deserves some color-changing tulips. Here is a brief summary of each tulip, but I encourage you to visit Longfield Gardens’ website to learn more.


I’ve been crushing on Shirley for a long time now — and can’t wait to see her in all her glory next spring. Surely she’s a winner — right? :)

Shirley’s Details from Longfield Gardens:
A color-changing tulip that opens creamy white with lilac-purple stitching around the edge of each petal. As the blossoms mature, the color slowly spreads until the entire flower is laced with soft purple. Read more here.

Moulin Rouge

This tulip is so romantic, especially after seeing how Longfield Gardens displayed the blooms in a vase. Moulin Range would be the perfect pick-me-up.

Moulin Range’s Details from Longfield Gardens: 
This color-changing tulip puts on a new show every day. It opens creamy white with striking raspberry-pink accents. As the flower matures, the petals become more colorful, until they’re almost completely suffused with cherry pink, rose and crimson. Read more here.

Flaming Purissima

For a more delicate touch, Flaming Purissima belongs in your garden with its classy, white-to-pink blooms.

Flaming Purissima’s Details from Longfield Gardens: 
Welcome spring with this elegant, early-blooming tulip. Like all Emperor tulips, the flowers change day by day, opening ever wider as they mature. The colors also soften from pink to snowy white. An ideal companion for daffodils and hyacinths. 
Read more here.

So, which tulip is your favorite?
What? All of them?
Yeah, me too.
Better order now! I heard these beauties go fast!


Image credit: Longfield Gardens.

From Our Garden Friends: Blog Posts We’re Loving

There is so much garden goodness floating around the internet, I felt compelled to share! Here’s my weekly round-up of blog posts I found inspiring and highly pin-able.

J Peterson Garden Design

On my dream farm, I will have chickens. In the meantime, I daydream by perusing websites, blogs and magazines all regarding chickens. I even show my son YouTube videos of chickens (just so he’ll know what to do when we actually get some mini-cluckers). So you can imagine my excitement when my friend Jenny Peterson posted videos of her chicks as they were gearing up (or down) to lay some eggs! I’m sharing one of the videos – PLEASE click here to see the other video of her Daisy Belle. They’re so fun to watch!

Garden Media Group

What first caught my eye about this blog post from my friends at Garden Media Group, was its title: “New Study Finds Treehuggers Had It Right All Along” (Um…how could you not click on that link?!?) Not necessarily for the treehugger comment, but I really wanted to know what they’ve known all along. Don’t you?

Well….I’m not telling. You’ll have to click here to see the answer.

Sidenote: Isn’t that little man the cutest thing you ever saw? All the more reason to get your kids involved in gardening, not only to plant a tree, but for a great photo opt. 






While I’m already married and not the biggest fan of dresses — I’d sure find a place to wear this beauty thanks to Flowerona’s last blog post. It would have been really cool to walk down the aisle draped in flowers. Can you imagine?!? Click here to see more gorgeous, fashionable ways to accent your wardrobe with flowers.


Did you miss last week’s round-up of blog posts we loved? Got ya covered. Click here, and if you so dare, click here. If you’ve got a favorite blog — maybe it’s your own? — let me know! I’m always on the hunt for trendsetters.

From Our Garden Friends: Blog Posts We’re Loving

There is so much garden goodness floating around the internet, I felt compelled to share! Here’s my weekly round-up of blog posts I found inspiring and highly pin-able.

The Handmade Home

I love the sassy, tell-it-like-it-is way about Ashley at The Handmade Home: “At first I was all, “Awe, a caterpillar!” And then I was all, “Ew, that’s bad. And he’s creeping me out because he’s fat and gross” and I refused to smush him because it a. felt mean and b. I’m still traumatized from a childhood caterpillar guts experience.” But frankly, I love the frankness whether she’s tooling in the garden or re-inventing her home. Read her latest garden update — including how she involves the kidlets — right here.


My Sweet Savannah

I love salvaged or vintage finds in the garden. This potting bench has me on my knees! You have to see it in its entirety on My Sweet Savannah. I’m so envious!


Southern Hospitality 

Confession: I’m not the best houseplant caregiver. But I’d sure give it a go, if only to have the stately fig tree grace the corner of my dining room much like Southern Hospitality has done in her bedroom. The large, textured leaves are quite stylish. See more display ideas on her latest blog post here.

Who is your favorite blogger? Let me know — I’m always looking to be inspired.

PS: Did you catch my favorite garden posts from last week? Here’s your chance.

From Our Garden Friends: Blog Posts We’re Loving

There is so much garden goodness floating around the internet, I felt compelled to share! Here’s my weekly round-up of blog posts I found inspiring and highly pin-able.

Growing With Plants

Hey, listen, herbs are hot. Why? They’re a multi-tasking plant adding fragrance, flavor and beauty to your home and garden. I’m loving how Matt Mattus makes his favorite herbs feel right at home by displaying them in herbalicious fashion throughout his abode. Are you ready to be inspired? Read the entire article here on Growing with Plants.


Urban Gardens

What makes public transportation even greener? Green roofs! Learn how a father uses Phytokinetic to green-up urban spaces and how he actually did his market research on his 6 and 9 year old children and their friends (major bonus points for involving the kids!) Read the entire article here from Urban Gardens.


Studio G

While my garden generally invokes a more casual, sometimes hap-hazard design, this simple and elegant display caught my eye immediately on Studio G’s blog. Is black the new — black? It sure pops against the boxwoods and moss. Read her entire article showcasing black slats in an outdoor space (perfect for sophisticated privacy) and let me know if it’s a style you like as well.

Who is your favorite blogger? Let me know — I’m always looking to be inspired.


I’m fresh off the road from OFA — an industry education and trade show I hope to be sharing more of in the near future — but HAD TO share with you now the true beauty of the Everlasting hydrangeas. You may remember reading about them from Angela Treadwell-Palmer with Plants Nouveau in a recent blog post. I got to see them in person! Actually touched them! {hmmm…..drooled a bit on them too}.

You have to see the blooms of the ‘Opal’ Everlasting hydrangea….


These blooms were all on the same plant. THE SAME ‘OPAL’ EVERLASTING HYDRANGEA!! See……!

Gosh, how could you not love that about a plant?!?! The details in the range of colors was phenomenal. Blew me away. Got me thinking how I could stow one away in my carry-on bag at the airport {never did figure that out}.  I’m telling you my fellow plant geeks — this hydrangea is one to try in your garden! Here are its specifics:

Size 3-4′ tall by 3-4′ wide
USDA hardiness Zones 4-9
Sun / Shade full sun to part shade
Soil average garden soil
Moisture moist, but well drained
Disease and Pests none known
Landscape use foundations, cutting gardens, wildlife gardens, borders, foundations, small urban gardens
Uniqueness Strong, sturdy stems support large lavender pink mop head blooms that age to a lovely lime green.
Propagation Methods vegetative cuttings
Date of Introduction 2011
Bloom Time May-June


Click here to pre-order one — or five — for your garden!


Images taken from phone. Please see Plants Nouveau’s website for more images or

PS: Fuel your own hydrangea obsession on Pinterest — check out our board “Hydrangea Varieties” or visit our plant encyclopedia page for hydrangeas.

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