Denny Schrock

Crocus plus

After a couple of days with record warmth in the 70s and 80s, early spring bulbs are displaying their vernal glory in my yard. As of March 14 the landscape features eight different types of crocuses, three iris varieties, three kinds of daffodils, spring meadow saffron, snowdrops, winter aconite, and pasque flower in bloom. This early color may not last long because temperatures are predicted to remain in the 70s through next week, but it’s such a welcome sight to see splashes of color dotting the yard before winter officially makes its exit.

Here are some current photos from the yard.

My favorite crocus is Crocus fuscotinctus. Its bright gold flowers have purplish maroon stripes on the outside of the petals, and it's always one of the first to come into bloom. It's growing near the mailbox, where it withstands winter road salt.

It's easy to see where the tricolor part of the name comes from for Crocus sieberi 'Tricolor'. Lilac-purple petals have a golden base with a stripe of white in between.

Crocus vernus 'Grand Maitre' translates as Grand Master, an apt name for this gorgeous purple crocus with an intricately frilly orange stigma.

Crocus flavus has large, intense yellow blooms that open wide only when the sun is shining. On cloudy days and at night, they close up.

Spring meadow saffron (Bulbocodium vernum) is a crocus cousin native to the Pyrenees and Alps. It is sometimes called Colchicum vernum.

Spanish iris (Iris hispanica 'George') has deep purple blooms with colorful markings on its nearly tubular falls. It grows nearly one foot tall.

Reticulate iris (Iris reticulata 'Harmony') has purple-blue petals with distinctive markings on its falls. It reaches just six inches tall.