Pie Crust

Naomi Robinson

Blueberry Two-Crust Pie

You know what’s better than a double-crusted blueberry pie? One with a streusel topping. I couldn’t help it, so I had to try it to see if it would be overkill or a great add-on. The verdict, the streusel and crust in every bite–killer. I’m pretty sure you are going to love this as much as I did, especially, since it’s not only simple in design, but also in preparation.

Of course I made my blueberry pie as mini pies, but feel free to stick to the recipe by making it one large one. Sure, it’s a little more work to make a few minis, but the payoff is definitely there.

I love the way minis lend themselves to a great presentation and there’s just something about small desserts that always seems to elicit a few extra oohs and aahs.

Aside from that, if you have a family like mine—there better be enough crust to go around or else you’ll end up with a pie pan full of filling. I’m serious, they will pick through the crust like it’s their own personal pie. See how I solved that problem—mini pies.

 

To get started on this recipe, click here. To add the streusel (I used silvered almonds for the nuts and coarsely chopped it), click here for the recipe and add it to the crust in the last 20 minutes of bake time.


Delish Dish Editor

Cooking the Cover: Thanksgiving Pie

Hi there! I’m Beth, Assistant Digital Food Editor for BHG. It’s always my job to make the pies for Thanksgiving. So for my first post, I decided to make a pie as a dry run for the big event. But not just any pie. The holy grail of pies. The Caramel-Apple Cherry Pie from the November BHG cover, developed by none other than Gesine Bullock-Prado, the unofficial queen of pies. When I told my coworkers I was attempting this pie, I got a lot of skeptical looks. My sister even told me I was crazy.

I started with my Grandma’s piecrust recipe because it’s the only one I use. My other secret weapon was a pica pole my friend had loaned me. A pica pole is just a long metal ruler that was used to make newspaper layouts long ago. She slides it underneath her rolled out piecrust so that it doesn’t stick to her counter. Which is awesome because my piecrusts always stick to my counter. It worked like a charm. I skipped the pie weights, but I must admit that I stuck pretty close to my oven, checking through the window every couple of minutes like an anxious mother. For my apple filling, I swapped out a few Granny Smith apples for Honeycrisp to add some sweetness, and both of my fillings came together in a snap. As my caramel apples started to bubble and thicken, I began to think that I just might pull it off.

Then came the leaves. I was in a pickle. I didn’t have a fancy leaf cookie cutter (who has a fancy leaf cookie cutter?!), but I did have a Christmas tree cookie cutter. So I just pressed the end of the Christmas tree in opposite directions to form a shape I thought looked leaf-ish. After buttering and sugaring my “leaves” I alternated the fillings to put together the pie. Since I knew that my pie plate didn’t really qualify as deep dish, I only filled it to the brim and left out some of my caramel apples. Which I was pretty sure could easily double as a delicious ice cream topping later.

After another round of obsessively checking through the oven window, my masterpiece was done! Though it wasn’t an exact replica of the cover, I was one proud baker. At work the next day, everyone gobbled up my pie. Which was a good thing considering it was my Thanksgiving rehearsal pie. All in all, though it might have been the hardest pie I’ve ever attempted, I can proudly say I tackled the holy grail of pies. Get the recipe. Watch how to make it here!

 

Grandma’s Piecrust

1  1/2    cup of flour

1/2        tsp salt

2/3        cup of Crisco

1/3        cup of water

 

Cut Crisco into flour and salt with fork. Add enough water (cold) to knead into large ball. Divide dough in half and roll on floured board. Makes 2 crusts.