edamame

Erin Gleeson

Ingredient Obsession: Edamame Hummus

Hello from The Forest Feast! Lately I have been really into edamame. Since I don’t eat much meat, I am always looking for different sources of protein, and there is a lot you can do with these bright green little beans. Using this Edamame Humus recipe, I whirred them up in my food processor to make a colorful, healthy dip. Out here in the woods, we love having snacks with our cocktails before dinner, and this is a fun alternative to regular hummus. Considering its color, if you serve it with red bell peppers it’ll be a festive appetizer to serve at a holiday party this time of year.

A great cocktail hour snack! And easy to make ahead for holiday entertaining…

 

Edamame Hummus

Ingredients

  • 1 10 ounce package frozen sweet soybeans (edamame)
  • 1/2 cup snipped fresh Italian (flat-leaf) parsley (I left this out since I am not a big parsley fan, but you could alternatively add basil or cilantro)
  • 1/4 cup lemon juice (lime also works)
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 1 tablespoon tahini (sesame seed paste)
  • 3 cloves garlic, peeled and quartered
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1/3 cup olive oil
  • 1/8 teaspoon paprika (optional, for garnish)
  • 8 cups assorted vegetable dippers, such as sweet red bell pepper pieces, cucumber slices, baby carrots, snow pea pods, and/or celery sticks

Directions

1. Shell and cook edamame until tender according to package directions; drain. Several grocery stores sell pre-cooked shelled edamame beans in the frozen section.

2. In a food processor combine edamame, parsley, lemon juice, the water, tahini, garlic, salt, and cumin. Cover and process until smooth. With food processor running, slowly add oil in a thin steady stream, processing until smooth. Add additional water if necessary to reach desired consistency. If desired, sprinkle with paprika. Serve with vegetable dippers or crackers.

The Forest Feast is a blog by Erin Gleeson full of simple, colorful vegetable based recipes. After working for many years as a food photographer in NYC, Erin moved to a cabin in the woods last summer where she is currently working on The Forest Feast Cookbook.