BHG Delish Dish

Stirring Up Ideas In The Kitchen

cakes

Hello Delish Dish readers! It’s Heather from Sprinkle Bakes again, and I’m back with a final recipe for our Month of Chocolate. By now you know that I love all kinds of desserts, but I am a true cake baker at heart. Selecting a chocolate cake recipe from the BHG archives was a tough choice (there are so many good ones!) but this Black Tie Cake won me over. I was certain with just a couple of tweaks the recipe could be made into the best Black Forest cake you’ve ever tasted!

Black Forest Cake

First you’ll need to find a 12 ounce jar of Morello cherries. These cherries are dark and sweet and just tart enough. You can find them at specialty grocery stores, or you can use canned dark pitted cherries that are widely available at all grocery stores.

Bake the cake portion of the recipe exactly as written – it’s perfect! Completely omit the white chocolate mousse topping. We’re replacing it with 2 1/2 cups fluffy whipped cream, which can be made with 1 1/4 cups heavy cream beaten with 1/4 cup sugar. Just pile the whipped cream on top of the cake and make a little divot in the center – this is where the cherries will go.

Black Forest Cake

Drain the cherries well and pat them dry on paper towels; pile them in the center of the cake. I gave this cake a generous sprinkling of chocolate shavings, which are easily made with a bar of chocolate and a vegetable peeler. Just lay a piece of parchment on a work surface and scrape the peeler across the edge of the chocolate. Chocolate shavings will melt easily between your fingertips, so swiftly sprinkle them over the cake.

Black Forest Cake

This cake was so delicious and quick to assemble, especially compared to most black forest cake recipes that have many layers. Get the printable recipe right here!

I hope you’ve enjoyed this ‘Month of Chocolate’ as much as I have. Until next time!


Hello Delish Dish readers! My name is Zainab and I’m the recipe developer and shoe obsessed blogger over at Blahnik Baker, where you will find classic and elegant dessert recipes for any occasion. I am honored to be over here today and I hope you enjoy this Honey Coconut Angel Food Cake recipe.

Honey Coconut Angel Food Cake

I grew up in tropical Sierra Leone eating a lot of mangoes, coconut and guavas from trees in our backyard. Many of my recipes are inspired by this love for tropical flavors like this Chocolate Coconut Pound Cake or Coconut Mascarpone Mousse. So it was not surprising that when I wanted to add a twist to the classic summer angel food cake, coconut was the first thing that came to mind. Angel food cake has always seemed daunting and difficult to me and I’ve avoided making it, earning itself a spot on my baking bucket list. But when I came across this video in the Better Homes and Garden archives a few weeks ago, I knew it was time to take on the challenge. Armed with all the tips and tricks from the video I not only made a successful first batch, I was able to add my own tropical twist in my next few attempts as I tested this honey coconut angel food cake recipe!

Honey Coconut Angel Food Cake

This recipe takes the classic angel food cake to a whole new level. Sweetened naturally with honey, this soft, airy and fluffy cake with crusty exterior is topped with coconut whipped cream and fresh berries. Pure summer bliss, if you ask me! I used this BHG angel food cake recipe and made a few changes to the original recipe:

-       First I added a teaspoon of coconut extract to the egg whites before whipping.

-       Then after beating the egg whites to soft peaks, I gradually poured in 1/4 cup natural honey. I reduced the granulated sugar to 1/2 cup.

A few tips I will suggest if this is your first time making angel food cake:

  • Make sure you separate your egg whites from the yolk when the eggs are cold. You do no want any yolk (or fat) in your egg whites.
  • Let the egg whites sit at room temperature for at least 30 minutes to an hour.
  • Please sift your powdered sugar and flour together at least three times. Very important to have an airy flour mixture.
  • Finally, do not over beat the egg whites. Beat just until stiff peak forms and the mixture flows slightly when bowl is tilted.

To decorate, I topped the cake with homemade coconut whipped cream. In a medium bowl, combine 1 cup cold heavy whipping cream, ¼ cup powdered sugar and 1 teaspoon coconut extract. Whip using an electric mixer until stiff peak forms. Top cake with whipped cream and fresh berries.

Honey Coconut Angel Food Cake

This honey coconut angel food cake is fast becoming a family favorite and a crowd pleaser! I hope you enjoy this as much as we did. Happy Baking!

For the full recipe and instructions, click HERE!


Greetings! Jessica Christensen, editor with BHG special food publications, here. I’ve had two big events in my life this month that I want to share. First, my little baby boy had his first big birthday! Second, my newest magazine, Cakes!, just hit the newsstands (for a special sneak peek, check out this exclusive slideshow with my absolute favorite recipes from the magazine). Now, I wouldn’t be a true food editor if I couldn’t figure out a way to capitalize on both of these events and wrap them into a blog.

Find Cakes magazine on newsstands from March 15–June 6, 2013 or purchase it online at Zinio.com.

So last Friday, after work, I set out to create two super cute cakes from our magazine for my son’s birthday party. Now folks, this isn’t my first time at the rodeo. After baking my own wedding cake (not the best plan I’ve ever had) four years ago, I know that baking and freezing the actual cakes ahead of time is important. I had completed that step the week before and almost wept with relief that I didn’t have to start baking at 6:00 the night before the birthday party. With all the decorating ahead of me, even cake mix would be too much to ask at that time of night. I’d let the cakes thaw out during the day, so now all I had to do was cut, frost, and decorate. Easy, right? Here are the two recipes I was trying to create—Race Car Cakes and Tropical Fish Cake:

I started with the Race Car Cakes. This recipe makes two cars, each of which is made from a round cake layer (like you would use for a two-layer cake), cut in half crosswise and sandwiched together with frosting. The car is “shaped” by cutting out a windshield section free hand. I decided to make one green one for the boys at the party and one purple one for the girls. Then I decorated one like the Race Car in the photo above and the other like the Flower Car Cake variation at the bottom of the Race Car Cakes recipe. The decorations included Rips licorice pieces (I think these are available at hobby and crafts stores) for the windows, Fruit by the Foot for the stripes, Tic Tacs for the numbers on the side of the car, Oreos for the tires, and Skittles for the flowers.

Next I worked on my son’s “smash cake,” which was a miniature version of the larger Race Car Cakes above.  I’m new to this parenting thing, but apparently it’s traditional for kids to smash into a small cake on their first birthday and feed it to themselves. (After feeding my son nothing but organic food for 12 months, it took all my strength to allow him to shovel loads of sugar into his mouth in this manner.) This round cake was baked in a 6-inch round cake pan, instead of a 9-inch pan like the larger ones. I then cut it down slightly to make it even smaller. But it was essentially shaped and decorated in the same way as the ones above. Before serving it to him, I took all the candy decorations off. Toddlers and small pieces of candy do not mix.

Finally, because I’m a glutton for punishment,  I made the Tropical Fish Cake. This is not a difficult cake, but by the time I finished the other three cakes, it was nearing 9:30 p.m. I was tired. The kitchen was a disaster and looked like a can of frosting had exploded in it. I had a feeling the whole fish cake decorating experience wasn’t going to end well. Sure enough, despite the fact that I successfully cut the corners from this 13×9-inch cake as directed and got the top and bottom fins placed correctly on the unfrosted version (as seen in picture 2 below), I could not figure out how to place them back on the fish cake once they were frosted (geometry is not my forte). As you’ll see from picture 3, below, my fish almost went to the party looking like he was deformed or swimming backwards. At that point I didn’t even care.

But, for my son’s sake, I summoned my last ounce of strength and spun the fins around (at least a dozen times) until I found the right position. My lack of understanding on how those fins were supposed to go bordered on ridiculous! I even had the photo from the magazine right in front of me. But the end results of the Tropical Fish Cake were worth my profound confusion and the extra hassle.

By the time I finished these four cakes around 10:30, I was exhausted. Luckily I remembered to put them downstairs where the cat wouldn’t get them (she has an unfortunate habit of licking baked goods while we’re all sleeping) before I crashed in bed still covered in frosting. I have a few final thoughts on these cakes. First—and I knew this before I even started—try to do your decorating when you’re fresh and full of energy in the morning. Second, all of the candies and decorations are just suggestions. It’s not always practical to buy 10 to 15 varieties to decorate one cake. Although you can bag up the leftover candy and hand it out as favors when the party is over. Third, the cute decorations and candies can make cutting and serving the cakes more difficult. If it becomes troublesome, do like I did, and remove the extra candies before serving up the cake. In the end, everybody loved the cakes and ate every last crumb. Including my main man…


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