brussels sprouts

Beth Nervig

Food Trends from the May Innovation Issue

Hi it’s Beth again, assistant food editor for bhg.com. Our newest issue of Better Homes and Gardens is packed with amazing kitchen gadgets and some seriously fun food trends. I couldn’t resist sharing my favorite recipes and trends with our Delish Dish readers.

1. Spice It Up!

Experimenting with new spices is totally on-trend right now. Dukkah, an aromatic mix of Egyptian spices and hazelnuts, is one of our favorite new spice blends. Make your own dukkah using spices you’ve already got in your pantry and try it on our Spicy and Honey Roasted Carrots.

2. Homemade Yogurt

Love yogurt? Me too! Yogurt has been one of the hottest food trends for the past few years, but more and more we’re seeing people make their own yogurt right at home with the help of an electric yogurt maker. Whether you’re making your own or buying it from the store, you’ve got to try our Chocolate and Mango Yogurt. It’s inspired by flavors from chic SoHo yogurt bars in New York City. And those guys know their yogurt.

3. Stack Your Cake

Sure layered cakes have been around for awhile, but the hottest new cake gets serious about its layers. The coolest thing about our new Apricot Stack Cake? You can make the layers right in your griddle, and just flip them like pancakes until golden. Couldn’t be easier! Or more scrumptious when you layer with our tangy apricot sauce and billowy whipped cream.

4. Bringin’ Back Brussels Sprouts

Brussels sprouts are the new “it” veggie. And if you’re turning up your nose right now, think again. You’ve probably had them boiled, maybe even roasted, but Brussels sprouts steal the show when shaved, like in our Tangy Grape and Apple Slaw. A little sauerkraut paired with sweet grapes and apples on a bed of shaved Brussels sprouts and watch out! New favorite side dish alert!

5. Easy as Pie

Everyone likes pie. But making a pie crust can be intimidating, not to mention time consuming. So when Jamie Oliver showed us his newest way to make a pie crust, we knew he was onto something! All you do is prepare your pie dough and then shape it into a log. Then you just freeze it and when you’re ready to make your pie, slice your dough into medallions to cover the bottom and top of your filling. It’s pretty, modern, and doesn’t require a rolling pin. Try this fun pie making trend with our Best-Ever Strawberry Rhubarb Pie.

Pick up our May issue of Better Homes and Gardens for more recipes featuring the latest food trends; plus find awesome new kitchen gadgets that we’re loving right now.

 


Erin Gleeson

In-season eats: blood orange glazed brussels sprouts and carrots

Blood oranges (and all kinds of citrus!) have been coming in my weekly CSA box of local produce. (A perk of living in sunny CAlifornia I guess!) I used the blood oranges to make this mildly sweet glaze for brussels sprouts and carrots and it came out wonderfully! Adding the nutmeg makes it a perfect chilly weather dish. Enjoy!

Ingredients

  • 2 cups fresh brussels sprouts
  • 3 medium carrots, cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 1/3 cup (blood) orange juice
  • 1 teaspoon cornstarch
  • 1/2 teaspoon sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg (optional)
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt

Directions

1. Cut Brussels sprouts in half. In a medium saucepan combine sprouts and carrots. In covered medium saucepan cook in a small amount of boiling water or steam for 10 to 12 minutes or until crisp-tender. Drain well. Return all of the vegetables to pan.

2. In a small bowl stir together the orange juice, cornstarch, sugar, nutmeg (if desired), and salt. Add to brussels sprouts and carrots. Cook and stir the mixture over medium heat until thickened and bubbly. Cook and stir for 1 minute more. Serve immediately. Makes 4 side-dish servings.

 

The Forest Feast is a blog by Erin Gleeson full of simple, colorful vegetable based recipes with photos and watercolor illustration. After working for many years as a food photographer in NYC, Erin moved to a cabin in the woods where she is currently working on The Forest Feast Cookbook. Follow Erin on Twitter and  Instagram, @theforestfeast.


Kristin Porter

ingredient obsession: brussels sprouts

If loving hearty, ultra-healthy Brussels sprouts is wrong, than I don’t want to be right!

Seriously though, my yearly obsession with the petite-cabbage-looking veggie is in full force right now, and I recently took a break from the standard toss with olive oil, season with salt & pepper, then roast at 425 degrees for 30 minutes routine, to try rich, savory Creamy Roasted Brussels Sprouts as an easy side dish with dinner.

While Brussels sprouts look like mini cabbages, they actually grow on long stalks, and are harvested right around this time of year. Each tender head is plucked, cored, and then prepared in a variety of ways, from sauteing, to roasting. This recipe combines a little bit of both to create a seriously addictive little dish.

Start the Creamy Roasted Brussels Sprouts by cutting the cores off 1 lb. of Brussels sprouts, then cutting each sprout in half and discarding the outer leaves.

Next, saute aromatic garlic and onions in melted butter; then add the sprouts plus a pinch of dried thyme, and cook for a few minutes until they begin to soften and turn golden brown.

Now create a rich and luxurious cream sauce by adding-then-reducing chicken broth and whipping cream (I used evaporated milk for a lighter touch!) right in the same skillet.

Transfer the Brussels sprouts to a non-stick sprayed casserole dish, stir in freshly grated parmesan cheese, salt, and pepper, then sprinkle with a touch more cheese and bake until golden brown and bubbly.

Obsessed doesn’t even begin to describe how I feel about this dish! The Brussels sprouts are perfectly roasted from the skillet sear, but tender and chewy from baking in the cheesy, creamy sauce. I licked every lost drop from my plate.

That is to say – I liked this dish. A lot! And I bet you will too. If you’re looking for an easy-yet-elegant addition to dinner, or last-minute Thanksgiving side dish, give Creamy Roasted Brussels Sprouts a try!

Photo: Brussels sprouts from PKNewby.com.