BHG Delish Dish

Stirring Up Ideas In The Kitchen

Posts by Delish Dish Editor

I’m Carrie Boyd, associate food editor for BHG’s Special Interest Media (SIM), and I’m a sucker for egg rolls. And when I woke up Saturday morning, these meat-and-veggie-filled, fried appetizers sounded like the perfect Saturday snack. In an effort to save a little money and a few calories, I attempted to make my own egg rolls instead of calling the nearest Chinese delivery guy.

I loosely followed this Easy Egg Roll recipe, adapting the recipe a bit based on what I had in my fridge and pantry—I nixed the tablespoon of dry sherry, used fresh mushrooms (as opposed to canned), and went with powdered ginger after discovering my fresh ginger had come down with a bit of freezer burn.

A few of the ingredients, measured, prepped, and starring in my first attempt at amateur food styling:

And now let’s add the ground beef, mushrooms, egg roll wrappers, and the chopped cabbage I managed to convince The Boyfriend to make a grocery store run for during halftime of a March Madness game.

Combine the water (not pictured), soy sauce, cornstarch, red pepper, and black pepper and set aside. After stir-frying the garlic for a few seconds,—the recipe calls for also including the fresh ginger in the stir-fry, but since I was using powdered, I just mixed it in the water-soy sauce liquid—add the cabbage and green onions to the skillet. Cook the meat until no longer pink, drain, then add the sauce for a few minutes before stirring in the mushrooms and stir-friend cabbage/green onions mixture:

After the whole mixture cooled for a bit, it was time to roll. Check out this great little primer for how to make egg rolls with step-by-step directions and a quick photo tutorial on rolling egg rolls. It does a much better job of demonstrating the rolling method than my amateur photo can provide. I added about a 1/2 inch of oil to the pan before letting each side of the egg rolls crisp up for a few seconds—it only took a few seconds.

And here’s a photo of the finished products, just chilling on some paper towels to drain off some residue grease

As you can see, my egg rolls are not exactly uniform in size (I got a bit impatient towards the end), but I can assure you they all tasted great. I served them with some sweet chile sauce and a few other appetizers when a friend (and her new baby!) stopped by on Saturday.


In this month’s roundup of our favorite food blog posts from around the web, we’re talking about brunch recipes. Whether you’re planning a casual Easter brunch or you just want to indulge in a tasty morning meal, these delicious breakfast and brunch recipes are sure to start your day deliciously.

1) An oldie but a goodie, these Pink Raised Doughnuts with Toasted Coconut from Joy the Baker are amazing. All of sudden, I feel the need to make homemade doughnuts.

 

2) Everything we love about baked potatoes rolled into a frittata? Um, yes please! Can’t wait to try the Loaded Baked Potato Frittata from Two Peas & Their Pod.

 

3) Sprouted Kitchen‘s homemade Multigrain Waffles topped with Greek yogurt and pomegranate seeds look seriously tasty, and dare we say, healthy, too! 

 

4) These springy Egg and Smoked Salmon Toasts from Audrey’s look perfect for Easter or any brunch get-together.

5)  Sophisticated creme fraiche and black cherry jam-topped Maple Syrupd Glazed Scones from Raspberri Cupcakes are a delightfully elegant brunch starter.

6) Turntable Kitchen and With Style and Grace teamed up to create this gluten-free, weekend-worthy breakfast beauty — Oatmeal with Torched Bananas.

7) Flavorful brunch dishes can be healthy, like this Spiced Cauliflower and Sweet Potato Breakfast Hash from Kiran Tarun.

 

 8) We’re pretty sure that the Buttermilk Crepes with Citrus Compote and Rosemary Honey from What Katie Ate are the stuff brunch dreams are made of.

9) Willow Bird Baking‘s Breakfast Stuffed Mushrooms are portabello mushroom caps filled with a leek and Gruyere scramble. Why hello, my new favorite brunch dish!

 10) We love it when we come across bloggers cooking BHG recipes. Like From the Little Yellow Kitchen‘s take on our Quinoa Pumpkin Seed Granola, complete with cute mason jar granola carrier. Bravo!

 

 

 


Greetings! Jessica Christensen, editor with BHG special food publications, here. I’ve had two big events in my life this month that I want to share. First, my little baby boy had his first big birthday! Second, my newest magazine, Cakes!, just hit the newsstands (for a special sneak peek, check out this exclusive slideshow with my absolute favorite recipes from the magazine). Now, I wouldn’t be a true food editor if I couldn’t figure out a way to capitalize on both of these events and wrap them into a blog.

Find Cakes magazine on newsstands from March 15–June 6, 2013 or purchase it online at Zinio.com.

So last Friday, after work, I set out to create two super cute cakes from our magazine for my son’s birthday party. Now folks, this isn’t my first time at the rodeo. After baking my own wedding cake (not the best plan I’ve ever had) four years ago, I know that baking and freezing the actual cakes ahead of time is important. I had completed that step the week before and almost wept with relief that I didn’t have to start baking at 6:00 the night before the birthday party. With all the decorating ahead of me, even cake mix would be too much to ask at that time of night. I’d let the cakes thaw out during the day, so now all I had to do was cut, frost, and decorate. Easy, right? Here are the two recipes I was trying to create—Race Car Cakes and Tropical Fish Cake:

I started with the Race Car Cakes. This recipe makes two cars, each of which is made from a round cake layer (like you would use for a two-layer cake), cut in half crosswise and sandwiched together with frosting. The car is “shaped” by cutting out a windshield section free hand. I decided to make one green one for the boys at the party and one purple one for the girls. Then I decorated one like the Race Car in the photo above and the other like the Flower Car Cake variation at the bottom of the Race Car Cakes recipe. The decorations included Rips licorice pieces (I think these are available at hobby and crafts stores) for the windows, Fruit by the Foot for the stripes, Tic Tacs for the numbers on the side of the car, Oreos for the tires, and Skittles for the flowers.

Next I worked on my son’s “smash cake,” which was a miniature version of the larger Race Car Cakes above.  I’m new to this parenting thing, but apparently it’s traditional for kids to smash into a small cake on their first birthday and feed it to themselves. (After feeding my son nothing but organic food for 12 months, it took all my strength to allow him to shovel loads of sugar into his mouth in this manner.) This round cake was baked in a 6-inch round cake pan, instead of a 9-inch pan like the larger ones. I then cut it down slightly to make it even smaller. But it was essentially shaped and decorated in the same way as the ones above. Before serving it to him, I took all the candy decorations off. Toddlers and small pieces of candy do not mix.

Finally, because I’m a glutton for punishment,  I made the Tropical Fish Cake. This is not a difficult cake, but by the time I finished the other three cakes, it was nearing 9:30 p.m. I was tired. The kitchen was a disaster and looked like a can of frosting had exploded in it. I had a feeling the whole fish cake decorating experience wasn’t going to end well. Sure enough, despite the fact that I successfully cut the corners from this 13×9-inch cake as directed and got the top and bottom fins placed correctly on the unfrosted version (as seen in picture 2 below), I could not figure out how to place them back on the fish cake once they were frosted (geometry is not my forte). As you’ll see from picture 3, below, my fish almost went to the party looking like he was deformed or swimming backwards. At that point I didn’t even care.

But, for my son’s sake, I summoned my last ounce of strength and spun the fins around (at least a dozen times) until I found the right position. My lack of understanding on how those fins were supposed to go bordered on ridiculous! I even had the photo from the magazine right in front of me. But the end results of the Tropical Fish Cake were worth my profound confusion and the extra hassle.

By the time I finished these four cakes around 10:30, I was exhausted. Luckily I remembered to put them downstairs where the cat wouldn’t get them (she has an unfortunate habit of licking baked goods while we’re all sleeping) before I crashed in bed still covered in frosting. I have a few final thoughts on these cakes. First—and I knew this before I even started—try to do your decorating when you’re fresh and full of energy in the morning. Second, all of the candies and decorations are just suggestions. It’s not always practical to buy 10 to 15 varieties to decorate one cake. Although you can bag up the leftover candy and hand it out as favors when the party is over. Third, the cute decorations and candies can make cutting and serving the cakes more difficult. If it becomes troublesome, do like I did, and remove the extra candies before serving up the cake. In the end, everybody loved the cakes and ate every last crumb. Including my main man…


You know that saying: “All I really need to know I learned in kindergarten”? Well, it applies to food, too.

 

Think about it. Most of the dishes and innovations that get us “foodies” excited come from humble beginnings. [Cue the image in your head of the wide-eyed food critic from the movie Ratatouille taking a bite of the reimagined favorite from his childhood.]

A Thomas Keller-esque interpretation of ratatouille

Jessie here, senior food editor at Diabetic Living magazine, a Better Homes & Gardens Special Interest publication. When I think back to the dishes that had me running full-speed for the dinner table when I was young, I can see chicken pot pies, macaroni and cheese (always with a side of applesauce), creamed tuna and peas on toast, and my mom’s amazing French toast that my siblings and I topped with our special labeled mix of “sug-a-mon”, a cinnamon and sugar blend.

 

Like many of you, my palate has matured since kindergarten, and I’ve been exposed to all the indulgences and amazing wonders that our nation’s abundant food system has to offer. In fact, just a few weeks ago, during a trip to Boston, I gorged on Crab-and-Beurre Blanc Beignets, Wasabi-Pistachio Crusted Chicken Fingers dipped in Caramel, Parmesan-Truffle Oil Fries, and a Grilled Vermont Cheddar + Major Grey’s Mango Chutney + Pickled Red Onion Sandwich. Sounds fancy, right? Oooh, and it was. It was awaken-your-brain good. So good was it, that I almost forgot I was eating fancied-up versions donuts, chicken strips, French fries, and grilled cheese. It all comes full circle.

 

And, trust. No one could be more excited than me that Grilled Cheese, perhaps the humblest of all, is having it’s day (or decade) at the foodie prom. Across the nation–in magazines, restaurants, food trucks, and at parties everywhere–grilled cheese is getting dressed up and frilled out.

Welcome to the Grilled Cheese Prom

Pepperoni-Olive Grilled Cheese

Tomato-Avocado Grilled Cheese

Tuna and White Bean Grilled Cheese

Taleggio and Pear Grilled Cheese

 

And the must-have prom accessory is…

Grilled Cheese Croutons!

I know the excitement can be intoxicating, so please drive safe.


Hi, I’m Grace Young, cookbook author and stir-fry guru. The wok is one of the most incredible cooking instruments, yet it’s sadly overlooked. I was delighted to create modern recipes that demonstrate the versatility of the wok for the April issue of Better Homes and Gardens.

Photo Credit (image on left): Steven Mark Needham
Photo Credit (image on right): Juli Leonard

With a wok you can pan-fry, braise, steam, boil, poach, deep-fry and even smoke foods. But the easiest way to fall in love with this iconic pan is to stir-fry. Seasonal ingredients are the key to a great stir-fry. The high heat and fast cooking accentuates the natural flavor and texture of ingredients, especially vegetables.

My favorite place to shop for produce is the farmer’s market. This spring as I wandered around the Union Square farmer’s market in New York City I couldn’t resist the young garlic, baby lettuce, and picture-perfect radishes. On the way home I stopped to buy shrimp, and by the time I was in my kitchen, I had the inspiration to create the Seared Shrimp Salad with Wok Dressing. I wanted a simple dressing, fragrant with sesame oil, but with a little kick from sriracha sauce, garlic, and a hint of honey.

I wrapped the just-cleaned shrimp with plenty of paper towels until they were dry to the touch. Excess moisture causes spattering and takes down the temperature of the pan, preventing the shrimp from searing. After a quick stir-fry the garlic, ginger, and coconut-infused shrimp is intensely flavored and laced with wok aroma. Served with young lettuce, radishes, avocado, and the warm dressing, this dish captures the fresh taste of springtime.

The beauty of a stir-fry is once you understand the basics you can improvise and vary the vegetables as the seasons evolve. From now until the end of autumn, stir-fries are at their best, when farmer’s markets are abundant with just harvested vegetables that come alive in your wok. I encourage you to explore your local farmer’s markets and buy what’s in season. If you’ve never cooked with a wok now’s the time to start your culinary love affair. Get the recipe here!


Hi all, it’s Sheena, digital editor for bhg.com, joining today. As a registered dietitian it’s my job to let the world know that March is national nutrition month! (No, that exclamation point is not a mistake, it really is that exciting!) I figured there’s no better time than during nutrition month to get refreshed on the MyPlate guidelines, so I cooked up this Garden Vegetables Lasagna meal that knocks out all five food groups.

As you can see, you can stick to “the plate” while still allowing your foods to touch. Think about this the next time you make a casserole, main-dish salad, or stir-fry. You can add every food group to recipes that mix ingredients. Want proof that all the food groups are accounted for in this recipe?

It may look skimpy in the protein group, but because there is so much dairy, which also contributes protein, this veggie-loaded meal still provides 29 grams of protein with only 421 calories! One other delicious thing about this recipe I must point out is the Essential Everyday Vinaigrette used for the salad. The name says it all. I would happily enjoy this dressing every single day. It’s so easy to make – especially using a screw-top jar for mixing ingredients – and tastes better than anything out of a bottle without strange ingredients I can’t pronounce. I bet you have each ingredient in your pantry right now.

It all comes together as an all-in-one meal the whole family will enjoy. Or one delicious dinner and a week’s worth of leftovers, if you eat like me.

For more healthy dinner ideas that fit with MyPlate check out these MyPlate recipes. Or learn more about MyPlate by clicking here to visit the MyPlate website.

 


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