BHG Centsational Style

diy

Every bedroom needs a dresser for clothing and apparel storage, and one style that’s caught my eye in the past year is the two tone white and wood combination. Crisp white and stained wood combine to create beautiful contrast, and the partnership on a piece of furniture adds a stylish modern look to any bedroom space.

two tone dresser

 

There are several dressers sold by retailers that will give you the two tone look similar to this credenza, but it’s one you also can mimic with a do-it-yourself project. 

two tone furniture

 

Last year I found a little chest at a thrift store and thought it was perfect for office supply storage for my husband’s office. I refurbished the stained drawers and painted the surround and pulls in a crisp white. (Full details here.)

 

stained wood and white chest

 

Duplicate Aubrey and Lindsay’s DIY dresser project with an inexpensive Rast dresser from IKEA, paint and stain from your local home improvement store, and brass ring pulls.

diy two tone dresser

 

Or skip the DIY and invest in one of these four lovely pieces!

 

two tone dressers

  Austin / Bleecker / Patchwork / Italian

 

Each makes a modern statement in your bedroom with a chic two tone finish!

 

Announcement & Invitation -  for those of you on Twitter I’m hosting a chat on spring decorating on April 2nd and BH&G is giving away $300 in prizes for those participating!  Follow me here!

 

april bhg twitter party

 

Mark your calendars for the event on Tuesday!

 

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One thing that will certainly cheer up your porch is a fresh coat of paint on the front door.  Last year I painted our front door with a shade of pale gray to complement the yellow stucco exterior, but there’s no need to choose a neutral if you don’t want to.  Be brave, be bold, choose green, yellow, red, blue, black, anything goes!  

How do you paint your front door?  It’s easy!  Painting your front door is a weekend project that’s sure to increase the curb appeal of your home and refresh the appearance of your residence with minimal effort.

green front door bhg

 

citrine front door bhg

 

There are two ways to paint a front door, the first is by removing it from the doorframe or even painting a new door before it’s installed.  The second is by painting a door in place. 

I prefer the latter because if you live in the residence, you need to be able to close and lock your front door at night!  However, if you’re working with a front door in an unoccupied residence, you certainly can remove it and prime/paint it at your leisure.

Here are the basic steps for painting your front door in place:

1.   Select a few paint samples and purchase testers in the colors you like.  Paint large test swatches on paper, cardboard, or poster board and allow it to dry.  Examine the colors suspended on the front door in different light to decide which shade looks best in both morning and afternoon.

2.  Determine if the paint on the front door is oil or water based paint with this simple trick:  soak a cotton ball in rubbing alcohol and rub it across the existing paint.  If the paint comes off, it’s latex, if it doesn’t, then it’s an oil based paint.  It’s important to know for Step 4 and 5!

3.  Remove the doorknob or tape it off and the knocker or other hardware with painter’s tape. 

4.  If your door is stained wood, or previously finished with oil based paint, it will need a coat of primer before your paint.   Coat your front door with one coat of quality adhesion primer.   Note that water based primers and paints allow for expansion and contraction outside among the elements far better than oil based paint, so work with water based primers and water based latex or enamel paints designed for outdoor use.

5.  If your door was previously painted with latex paint, degloss it first with a deglossing product to prepare it for another layer of water based paint.  Use a quality angled 1 ½ or 2” paintbrush to apply the latex or enamel paint to your front door, using thin coats to avoid drips and also speed up the drying process.  Some paints cover in two coats, often it takes three, but it’s best to work with thinner coats so that the layers dry quickly. 

6.  If you encounter minimal brush strokes or drips between coats, use a fine grit sanding wedge to knock down those edges.  After two (or perhaps three) coats of outdoor latex or enamel paint, step back and admire your beautiful new front door!

 

orange entry door

 

Painting your front door isn’t difficult, and what a difference it makes in just a day!  Have you changed the color of your front door? What color did you choose? 

 

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I love an easy do-it-yourself project, especially one everyone can do!  This project provides hidden organization inside a cabinet in your kitchen, mudroom, or office, and you can customize it with your favorite fabric for a fun pop of color like this cheerful Ikat inside a computer armoire I recently painted. 

 

diy fabric covered memo board

 

 

Supplies you will need:  cork tiles from an office supply store; cotton fabric of choice; box cutter or X-acto knife; stapler; multipurpose glue for securing different surfaces; push pins.

1.  Remove the cabinet door so you can work with it laying flat on a table, and determine the desired width of your fabric covered memo board.  If you have an inset on the back of your cabinet, it helps to work with that dimension, if not, simply pick a point an inch or two away from the edges so the new memo board won’t interfere with proper closing of the cabinet.   Carefully trim tiles with a box cutter or X-acto knife to your desired width.

 

box cutter for cork tiles

 

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