diy home decor

Chelsey Andrews

DIY-ify: Painting with Bleach

Painting with Bleach Lampshade and Napkins DIY // thepapermama.com
Last week I decided to try painting with bleach. Instead of adding color with paint, I’m taking it away. I have to say this was a fun experiment. You don’t really know how it’s going to turn out until everything is all washed and dry. It’s inexpensive and you can try it on most cotton fabrics! I painted on napkins and lampshades for my first attempt. Want to try it out for yourself? Check out the directions below.
Supplies:
  • Clorox Bleach Pen
  • old paintbrush
  • solid color cotton fabric napkins and/or a lampshade
  • gloves
  • goggles
Directions:
Painting with Bleach Lampshade DIY // thepapermama.com
Painting with Bleach Cloth Napkin DIY // thepapermama.com
STEP 1:
In a well ventilated area: put on your gloves, goggles, and apron (I did all this outside). Open the Clorox Bleach Pen and squirt some of the bleach into a jar.
Painting with Bleach Lampshade DIY // thepapermama.com
Painting with Bleach Cloth Napkin DIY // thepapermama.com
STEP 2:
Dip your paintbrush into the bleach and brush a small horizontal line onto the fabric and/or lampshade. You can do little short lines, or long lines. Create a little pattern with the lines. Don’t worry if the design isn’t perfect, freehand painting this project will give it charm. Though, if you’d prefer, you can always use a washable fabric pencil and ruler to mark where you want the lines to go.
Painting with Bleach Lampshade DIY // thepapermama.com
Painting with Bleach Cloth Napkin DIY // thepapermama.com
STEP 3:
Let the bleach sit on the fabric until you start to see the fabric turning white. Mine sat for about 3 hours.
Painting with Bleach Lampshade DIY // thepapermama.com
Painting with Bleach Cloth Napkin DIY // thepapermama.com
STEP 4:
Napkins: Wash and dry the napkins (separate from any clothes) before using.
Lampshade: Rinse off the bleach in the sink and let dry completely before using.
Painting with Bleach Lampshade DIY // thepapermama.com
Painting with Bleach Cloth Napkin DIY // thepapermama.com
You are done. Feel free to get creative with your designs! You don’t have to brush the bleach on with a paintbrush, instead you can use the tip of the Clorox Bleach brush to make a neat design. Polka dots, lines, and swirls. Maybe some flowers? Words? You can paint with bleach on most cotton items. Blankets, placemats, pillowcases, clothes… etc. Have fun!
- Chelsey, The Paper Mama
P.S. if you try any of my projects, I’d love to know! You can share a photo in the comments below, or tag me in a photo on Instagram. My username is: @thepapermama

Chelsey Andrews

DIY-ify: 14 Fabulous Decorating DIY Projects!

Trend: 14 Fabulous Decorating DIY Projects! 

It’s been so hot outside this past week that my family has been hiding in the cool air of our home. This has given us a TON of time to think up some new decorating ideas. I love this BHG post and was inspired to find some tutorials and DIY’s from their list of decorating ideas. While the headboard DIY may take a bit of time, most of these projects listed below are quick ways to add some color and design to your home.

 

1. Add a coat of paint to some old furniture, from Natty By Design.

2. DIY Faux Wallpaper (made with a sharpie), from Vintage Revivals.

3. Update old frames with colorful paint, from BHG.

4. No-Sew DIY Rickrack Window Panels, from BHG.

5. DIY Tablet Stand (perfect for reading recipes in the kitchen), from The Lowes Blog.

6. DIY Banquet Seating, from Melodrama.

7. Natural Dyed Lamp Shade from BHG Style Spotters.

8. DIY Painted Memo Board, from Lemon Drop Life.

9. Silhouette Artwork DIY, from The Paper Mama.

10. Bookcase Back Panel Herringbone Makeover, from LollyJane.

11. Fabric Dyed Pillow, from High on DIY.

12. Fabric Upholstered Headboard with Curved Arms, from Sarah M. Dorsey Designs.

13. Frames Made of Washi Tape, from Design Sponge.

14. Skip the paint and try a fabric wall panels instead, from Bella Dia.

What are you up to this summer? Any decorating ideas?

- Chelsey, The Paper Mama

P.S. Photos from the first image are from BHGNatty By DesignSarah M. Dorsey DesignsLemon Drop Life, and Vintage Revivals.


Chelsey Andrews

Photo Canvas DIY: 2 Ways

Do you love photo canvases, but don’t really have the budget to buy them? Well today I’m going to share 2 ways you can make these neat creations without breaking the bank. The first way we’ll use iron-on transfer paper to transfer an image to fabric, then print onto tissue paper and Mod Podge the image! Trust me, it’s easy. They are great gifts, or just keep them for yourself to decorate your home.

Iron-on Fabric Photo Canvas DIY

Supplies:

  • 8 x 8 canvas
  • 1/2 yard of white fabric
  • fabric iron-on paper
  • iron
  • high quality photo
  • scissors
  • staple gun and staples

Directions: 

- Let’s start with printing our photo onto the iron-on transfer paper. Set up your photo on your computer. Flip it horizontal so the image is “backwards”. The image will iron-on the correct way when transferred to fabric. Note: if you don’t have a printer, you can take an image to a local print shop. I’ve brought my iron-on transfer paper to a local printer in the past and they printed on it for me. Just call them and ask. You can also ask them to flip the image for you, if you’re not sure how.

- Iron-on the image onto the fabric (following your iron-on transfer paper instructions). Let cool and peel back paper. Trim the fabric to an 11 x 11 square.

- Center the image on the front of the canvas. Carefully flip over and staple the fabric onto the back of the frame. Fold fabric corners on the top and bottom of the frame. Note: if you mess up and the image isn’t even over the canvas, just pull out a staples and start over.

- You are done! The cool thing about this project is you can use an old canvas frame. Have a painting you don’t like anymore? You can just staple this fabric over the painting. Just pull the fabric off if you get tired of the image.

Total cost: under $15

Mod Podge Tissue Photo Canvas Diy

  • 8 x 8 canvas
  • 8.5 x 11 printer paper
  • 8 x 8 image
  • white tissue paper
  • painters tape
  • acrylic sealer spray
  • Mod Podge
  • paintbrush
  • white acrylic paint
  • printer

Directions:

- Let’s prep the picture. Carefully smooth out and tape the white tissue paper onto the printer paper (you’re printing onto the tissue paper). Put it into the printer and print your 8 x 8 image. Let the printed image dry completely. Note: while taping the tissue paper onto the printer paper, make sure the tissue is very smooth. If it’s too wrinkly it will print weird.

- In a well ventilated area wearing a mask and eye protection, spay a very light layer of acrylic sealer spray onto the printed tissue image. Let dry for an hour. Carefully remove the printed tissue paper from the printer paper. Trim the sides of the tissue paper (leave a 1/4 inch border around the image).

- Grab your canvas and apply a very light layer of Mod Podge. Very carefully place the printed tissue image onto the mod podged canvas. Carefully smooth out the image from the center out. Apply one more coat of Mod Podge over the tissue image to seal the picture. Let dry for a couple of hours.

- Use the white acrylic paint to cover the side of the canvas (to cover any excess tissue that folded over the side). Apply 2 – 3 coats of the paint.

- When the paint is dry, you’re done!

Total cost: around $10

I hope you enjoy! Let me know how this Photo Canvas creating goes!

- Chelsey, The Paper Mama 


Chelsey Andrews

DIY-ify: $5 Macrame Plant Hanger

The 70′s called and it wants macrame back. That’s not going to happen because I love a cute macrame plant hanger. They are so cute and I love them. You can put flowers or succulents in your hangers, or how about some herbs? Wouldn’t these be cute with a mini oregano hanging out in there? A little grouping of herbs hanging in your kitchen window?

Supplies: 

  • Colorful yarn
  • Cute mini planter
  • Plant (I used a succulent)
  • Scissors

Directions: 

Step 1: 

Cut out eight 36 inch long pieces of yarn.

Step 2: 

Tie a big knot to keep all your yarn pieces together. This knot will also be the center of the bottom of the hanger.

Step 3: 

Split up the yarn into four sections (2 pieces per section).

Step 4: 

Tie a knot in each section. The spacing from the main center knot to the first section knot is up to you. Since my planter is tiny, I tied my first knot about 1/2 inch from the center. These set of knots should be somewhere under the planter base. Repeat this step with all four sections (the first set of knots are highlighted in pink).

Tip: feel free to test the planter in the yarn as you go along. This will help you place the knots properly.

Step 5:

Next, grab a piece of yarn from one section and match it with a piece of yarn from it’s neighboring yarn section. Check the image above for help. Repeat with all four sections. Again, the length from one knot to the next will depend on the size of your planter. These knots should be located in the bottom 1/2 of your planter (the second set of knots are highlighted in yellow).

Step 6:

Repeat step 5 to make another set of knots. These knots should be located around the top 1/2 of the planter. Repeat with all 4 sections (the third set of knots are highlighted in blue).

Step 7:

The last set of knots should be located somewhere above the planter (see image for reference). Tie all the yarn pieces into a final knot a couple inches above the last set of knots (you’ll see the fourth set of knots above the plant).

Step 8:

Tie a loop above that fourth knot. From here you can braid the remaining yarn, put some beads on, or just plain tie a loop. It’s completely up to you.

These items would also be SO cute as little gifts and/or party favors!

- Chelsey, The Paper Mama

P.S. I made this cute little planter for my ebook: Make Your Day


Chelsey Andrews

DIY-ify: Yarn Jack ‘o Lantern Face

Trend: the no-carve pumpkin. Skip the mess and make a Yarn Jack o’ Lantern Face! I found this idea in the Better Homes and Gardens archives and I needed to give it a try and show all of you how to make this for yourself (little Jack ‘o Lantern face templates included).

Supplies:

- 1 pumpkin (real or foam, your choice)

- pack of 100 gold pin heads

- black acrylic yarn

- painter’s tape

- Jack ‘o Lantern Face Templates (One, Two, Three, Four)

Directions:

- Print out your Jack ‘o Lantern Face Templates.  Pick out the face size you’d like and cut it out.

- Use little folded painter’s tape squares to arrange and set up the mouth, nose, and eyes.

- Grab your pins and push them into the pumpkin near all the points + corners of the Jack ‘o Lantern face. Don’t push them ALL the way down to the pumpkin skin, keep the pin heads up about 1/4 inch. Next, place pins along some of the main “pumpkin lines” to create the stripey portion of this pumpkin.

- Pick a pin to start with, and tie a double knot onto it. Push the pin all the way into the pumpkin to secure the yarn. Follow the shape of the face, eyes, and mouth and add the stripey lines (wrapping the yarn twice around each pin as you go, then pushing them into the pumpkin to secure). Tie knots along other pins if you need to stop the yarn and start on a new point.

You’re done! Since yarn doesn’t do too well outside, I recommend keeping this Jack ‘o Lantern out of the rain. I used a real pumpkin, but if you use a foam pumpkin you will have this guy to decorate your home next year!

- Chelsey, The Paper Mama


Chelsey Andrews

DIY-ify: Filing Cabinet Side Table

Trend: Filing Cabinet Side Table

The ‘ol filing cabinet, once used for organizing our many MANY papers, is now headed towards extinction. I don’t know about you, but the majority of my bills and other items are digital and saved on my mass storage drive. I’m no longer weighed down with a crazy collection of wasted paper. So, what do we do with this “antique” filing systems? We find a new use.

 

I found this little file cabinet at a thrift shop for $5. It was scratched/dented and not the prettiest color. I always see these cabinets hanging around at thrift shops and this got me thinking… how can I reuse these relics? I turned this short tabletop file cabinet into a little side table. To see how I did this, check it out below.

- First, clean up your filing cabinet. Then, use some painters tape to cover up anything you don’t want painted. I wanted to keep the silver handles clean for this side table. I used an X-acto knife to trim off any excess tape. Pull out the drawers to spray separately.

- Next, in a well ventilated space (preferably outdoors), spray two layers of primer paint. Let it dry at least an hour.

 

- Add some color! I used 3 layers of a pale blue spray paint, from Valspar. Since this color ONLY came in matte, I added a shiny clear coating over the entire table.  Let dry for at least 48 hours.

 

- Prep your table legs. I liked the shape and style of the Waddell Table Legs, from Lowes. The only down side, the legs were way too tall for a side table. SO, I cut each leg down to 14.5 inches high and drilled a hole (using a 5/16 inch wood drill bit) to add a new hole for each table leg. Add these 5/16 inch hanger bolts to replace the bolt section you cut off on these legs.

 

- Place these table leg tops on each corner of the bottom of the cabinet and use a permanent marker to mark a hole in the center. Use a 5/16 inch metal drill bit to drill a hole for each corner.

- Put each table leg top on the INSIDE of the cabinet, in each corner, and screw in the legs (one at a time).

 

- Place in your office, living room, studio, or right next to your table. Enjoy.

ENJOY! I use this little table to store my ribbons, tapes, and other things I need quickly.

- Chelsey, The Paper Mama