Curb Appeal

Chelsey Andrews

DIY-ify: 12 Colorful Porch Perk Ups

Trend: Colorful Porch Perk-Ups

Add some color to your porch or patio with these 12 inspiring DIY ideas. Pillows, chairs, tables, and more! Enjoy!

 Super Lovely DIY Porch Pillows, on A Beautiful Mess.

I’m absolutely in LOVE with this DIY Pallet Swing Bed, on The Merrythought.

 Updated Outdoor Chairs, on Design Sponge.

Pretty Painted Patio Rug, on All Things Thrifty.

Wire Cloche Succulent Garden Terrarium, on DIY Showoff.

Pretty Patio Table with Interchangeable Centerpiece, on Craptastic.

For those tiny patios and porches: Little Patio Table Update, on Lovely Indeed.

Add a base support to an old screen door, paint it, and turn it into patio decor, on BHG.

Pallet Serving Tray, on Live Laugh Rowe.

Front Door Makeover, on All Things Mamma.

 

Outdoor Concrete Side Table or Stool, on The Paper Mama on BHG.

Recycled Wood Planter, Zelo Photo Blog.

I don’t know about you, but I would LOVE to have the swinging porch bed in my yard. So comfy.

 

- Chelsey, The Paper Mama

P.S. The images in the first photo are from Design SpongeA Beautiful Mess, The Paper Mama on BHG, and DIY Showoff.


Nicole Balch

Get the Look: Front Porch

TREND: Modern updates for the front porch.

Does spring feel like it’s on its way to you yet? As March prepares to go out like a lamb, our thoughts often turn to sprucing up the outsides of our homes. Most houses, even the very traditional, look fantastic with a mix of modern and classic design updates like those on the front porch above. It’s an easy style to work with, and you can get a similar look with the items below. There are even two chairs to choose from: one that’s true to the inspiration image, and another to bring in even more modern style!

  1. Fisherman’s Indoor/Outdoor Pendant, Pottery Barn
  2. Threshold Lugano Potting Urn, Target
  3. Neutra House Numbers, Design Within Reach
  4. Braxton Outdoor Sconce, Restoration Hardware
  5. Sedona Chair with Cushion, Frontgate
  6. Penelope Lounge Chair, Room & Board
  7. Barcelona Floral Indoor/Outdoor Pillow, Pottery Barn

 

– Nicole Balch, Making it Lovely


Chelsey Andrews

DIY-ify: Mailbox Makeover for under $15!

A couple of weeks ago I shared 14 easy DIY projects to update your curb appeal, and it REALLY made me think about our poor neglected front yard. Everyday I come home I look at my plain ‘ol beat up mailbox and want to change it. I have wanted to do something about it forever, but didn’t actually do anything until this last week.We bought our house 5 years ago and have barely done anything to this little 1920′s home. Home improvement projects can be intimidating/pricey/and so very final. Know what I mean?

So, I got some guts and changed the mailbox. The best part about this project: it was free for me. I already had all the supplies to fix up this old guy. If you don’t have a crazy supply of spray paint/wood/and glue lying around, not a problem. It may cost you around $15 to update your dated mailbox.

Supplies:

- an old mailbox

- medium-grit sandpaper

- white metal primer spray paint

- gold spray paint

- hot pink spray paint

- clear acrylic sealer spray

- E6000 adhesive

- black acrylic paint

- roughly 42 inches of 2 inch wide x 1/4 inch thick pine wood (the amount you need will depend on your mailbox)

- paintbrush

 

Directions:

Step 1:

Remove any lose paint and rough up the metal surface with the medium-grit sandpaper.

Step 2:

Remove any dirt/dust with a wet rag.

Step 3:

Let’s paint!

Spray in the inside of the mailbox: In a well ventilated area (preferably outside wearing a mask and eye protection), spray paint the inside of your mailbox with multiple coats of the white primer (following dry time instructions on your paint can). Follow the primer with 2 – 3 coats of hot pink spray paint. Let the inside of your mailbox dry completely (24 hours +). When the paint has had a chance to dry for 24 + hours, cover the inside surface of the mailbox with painters tape and plastic to protect it from this next step.

Spray the outside of the mailbox:  In a well ventilated area (preferably outside wearing a mask and eye protection), spray paint the outside of your mailbox with multiple coats of the white primer, following dry time instructions on your paint can. Follow the primer with multiple coats of gold spray paint. I applied around 6 coats of this stuff. Let the inside of your mailbox dry completely (48 hours +).

Note: metal can be difficult to paint. If not done properly, it will peel or chip off easily. It’s pretty important to follow your spray paint instructions on your can. I find getting all the coats of paint done within 2 – 3 hours is best. If you wait too long in between coats, sometimes the paint will bubble. Applying multiple thin coats of paint will help avoid drips of paint. 

Step 4:

When I finished the painting steps I decided I really didn’t like the fleur de lis piece of the mailbox, so I pried it off and added a wooden frame over the space.

I used 42 inches of 2 inch wide by 1/4 thick pine wood. Your amount will depend on the size of your mailbox. You’ll need two pieces for the front, and 4 little pieces for the side. Measure out your wood pieces for the front and sides. Use a mitor box and saw to cut angled corners for your wood pieces.

Note: Don’t have a mitor box or saw? You can find them for pretty cheap at any home improvement store, or you can skip the side pieces and just put the wood on the front of the mailbox. I think that would still look lovely. 

Step 5:

Use your E6000 adhesive to glue the wood pieces onto your mailbox. Let the adhesive dry overnight.

Step 6:

Create a house number template on your computer and print it out. The font size will depend on your mailbox. Cut out the font template you made. Use a pencil to trace the numbers in the center of the wood frame. FYI: I used the free Chunkfive font for my template.

Step 7:

Use a fine point paintbrush to carefully paint the black acrylic paint into your traced numbers on the wood. Let the paint dry a couple hours and use a pencil to erase any left over pencil marks.

Step 8:

Let’s finish this project! Use your clear acrylic spray to seal the whole mailbox. Note: the spray will dull the gold a bit and darken the wood, but it will add some more protection to the paint and wood (so it was worth it in my mind). Let the spray dry for 24 – 48 hours.

Step 9:

Install your fancy new mailbox!

I’m so happy with how this turned out (my favorite part is the pop of hot pink inside).

- Chelsey, The Paper Mama


Chelsey Andrews

DIY-ify: 14 Easy Curb Appeal DIY’s!

Trend: DIY Curb Appeal.

With a few tricks and a bit of time you can update your home’s curb appeal. I’ve collected a few favorite DIY ideas (from some lovely bloggers) that I think anyone can recreate on a budget.

 Updated gatehouse (I love everything about this): Thistlewood Farms.

Paint that front door: 320 Sycamore.

Make your own flagstone walkway: AKA Design.

Change out the door numbers: Chloe Moore Photography.

Hide the A/C: Better Homes and Gardens.

Faux Frosted Glass DIY: Seventh House on the Left.

Paint the garage door: midcenturythriftygal.

Add a trellis over that garage door: Blue Roof Cabin.

Add a monogram wreath: Better Homes and Gardens.

 Mailbox makeover with stone: Beneath My Heart.

Add some beautiful plants: Cozy.Cottage.Cute.

DIY your own shutters: Centsational Girl.

Privacy trellis: Chez Larsson.

Unique house number display: Simply Ciani.

I hope you’ve been inspired. Please check out each DIY by clicking on the photos or links provided above!

- Chelsey


Allison Maze

I Spy: Black Front Doors

Trend: Black Front Doors

Chic, sophisticated, and strikingly handsome, these black beauties prove an entry door needn’t be bright to be bold. Exterior color is hot right now, and it’s one of the easiest ways to boost curb appeal. But if you quickly tire of flashy hues—or, like me, are horribly indecisive—a black front door may be the perfect match for your home.

There’s something so undeniably elegant about a black front door. I’ve been swooning over dark exterior details ever since a recent trip to Charleston. From stately mansions to small home designs, a dash of black can flatter almost any exterior’s style and color scheme.

 

Here’s how to give your entryway a polished look you’ll love to see each day.

Accessorize! Like that little black dress hanging in your closet, versatility is a black door’s best feature. With nature’s easy-to-please palette as your backdrop, black offers a dramatic welcome that wears well with every season. Personalize your entryway with coordinating hardware for a classic look, or add style underfoot with a colorful door mat and eye-catching container gardens.

 

Play up a black door’s elegance with architecture. Layer millwork near the entry or add a portico to give your home a gorgeous focal point that protects visitors from wet weather.

 

Make a good first impression. Give a black door a sense of warmth by surrounding it with plants and weather-resistant furniture. Outdoor benches and boxed topiaries enhance this coastal cottage’s inviting, stay-awhile personality.

 

What’s your favorite way to dress up a front door?

- Allison Maze, Assistant Digital Home Editor