canvas

Erin Menardi

Friday Finds 6.27

This week has been a particularly rainy one, and I’ve gotten a little antsy looking out my windows waiting for the weather to perk up. I’m the type of person who always has to be busy with something, and so I tried my luck with some of these awesome DIY projects this week (although mine didn’t turn out nearly as well):

With the Fourth of July coming up, I wanted to make something festive that I wouldn’t throw away as soon as the day was done. This Fourth of July Clothespin Wreath from Washi Tape Crafts is cute enough to leave up all year round.

 

I love flowers, and couldn’t pass up an opportunity to try this Gold Fruit Bowl DIY by House of Earnest. While gold paint creates a chic look, bright colors make the whole ensemble even more eye-catching.

 

 

As the days get (hopefully) more sunny, outdoor activities will become a regular routine. I love the playful look of this Painter’s Canvas Picnic Blanket I found on A Subtle Revelry’s blog. Such a cute and easy way to enjoy an afternoon laying on the grass.

 

 

I can’t wait to try out this gallery wall I spotted on The Proper Pinwheel. The random but unified collection of frames makes the room visually interesting but not overwhelming or distracting.

 

 

And while I like accessorizing rooms with textures, colors, and funky pieces, I’m starting to realize an appreciation for more minimalist, natural-looking decoration. These easy ways to decorate with tree branches on A Hammer and Heels brings a simplistic and earthy vibe to any room in the house.

 

 


Chelsey Andrews

Photo Canvas DIY: 2 Ways

Do you love photo canvases, but don’t really have the budget to buy them? Well today I’m going to share 2 ways you can make these neat creations without breaking the bank. The first way we’ll use iron-on transfer paper to transfer an image to fabric, then print onto tissue paper and Mod Podge the image! Trust me, it’s easy. They are great gifts, or just keep them for yourself to decorate your home.

Iron-on Fabric Photo Canvas DIY

Supplies:

  • 8 x 8 canvas
  • 1/2 yard of white fabric
  • fabric iron-on paper
  • iron
  • high quality photo
  • scissors
  • staple gun and staples

Directions: 

- Let’s start with printing our photo onto the iron-on transfer paper. Set up your photo on your computer. Flip it horizontal so the image is “backwards”. The image will iron-on the correct way when transferred to fabric. Note: if you don’t have a printer, you can take an image to a local print shop. I’ve brought my iron-on transfer paper to a local printer in the past and they printed on it for me. Just call them and ask. You can also ask them to flip the image for you, if you’re not sure how.

- Iron-on the image onto the fabric (following your iron-on transfer paper instructions). Let cool and peel back paper. Trim the fabric to an 11 x 11 square.

- Center the image on the front of the canvas. Carefully flip over and staple the fabric onto the back of the frame. Fold fabric corners on the top and bottom of the frame. Note: if you mess up and the image isn’t even over the canvas, just pull out a staples and start over.

- You are done! The cool thing about this project is you can use an old canvas frame. Have a painting you don’t like anymore? You can just staple this fabric over the painting. Just pull the fabric off if you get tired of the image.

Total cost: under $15

Mod Podge Tissue Photo Canvas Diy

  • 8 x 8 canvas
  • 8.5 x 11 printer paper
  • 8 x 8 image
  • white tissue paper
  • painters tape
  • acrylic sealer spray
  • Mod Podge
  • paintbrush
  • white acrylic paint
  • printer

Directions:

- Let’s prep the picture. Carefully smooth out and tape the white tissue paper onto the printer paper (you’re printing onto the tissue paper). Put it into the printer and print your 8 x 8 image. Let the printed image dry completely. Note: while taping the tissue paper onto the printer paper, make sure the tissue is very smooth. If it’s too wrinkly it will print weird.

- In a well ventilated area wearing a mask and eye protection, spay a very light layer of acrylic sealer spray onto the printed tissue image. Let dry for an hour. Carefully remove the printed tissue paper from the printer paper. Trim the sides of the tissue paper (leave a 1/4 inch border around the image).

- Grab your canvas and apply a very light layer of Mod Podge. Very carefully place the printed tissue image onto the mod podged canvas. Carefully smooth out the image from the center out. Apply one more coat of Mod Podge over the tissue image to seal the picture. Let dry for a couple of hours.

- Use the white acrylic paint to cover the side of the canvas (to cover any excess tissue that folded over the side). Apply 2 – 3 coats of the paint.

- When the paint is dry, you’re done!

Total cost: around $10

I hope you enjoy! Let me know how this Photo Canvas creating goes!

- Chelsey, The Paper Mama 


Chelsey Andrews

DIY-ify: Hidden Alarm Panel

 

Hello and a Happy New Year to all of you. I’m in full clean up and organize mode over here. Finishing up projects I have put off and making my home more comfy. First project of the year: the Hidden Alarm Panel. Yeah, that ugly thing I see each and EVERY time I walk into my home. While my husband really doesn’t ever notice it (as he told me), I always do. A few months ago I found a great idea to cover up this eyesore. I found it on the blog, The Third Boob. I’ve done things a bit differently than they did. My canvas print backing was made of cardboard, and their backing was made of wood. I used Command Strips to attach the hinges to mine, since the screws probably would hold too well (so if your canvas has a wood backing, use the screws instead of the strips).

 

 

Supplies needed: 

- Command Small Refill Wall Strips

- Two small flat hinges

- A canvas print

- Optional: Velcro to hold the open side down.

Directions:

- Using the command strips, attach the hinges to the canvas (following the Command Strip instructions).

 

 

- Place another Command Strip on the wall side of each hinge.

- Adhere the hinges to the wall. This can be a bit tricky getting things level, maybe a second set of hands would help?

 

 

- Optional: Since our canvas is right at the entrance, it kept swinging open when we opened our door. To fix this issue I added another set of Command strips to the backing of some light velcro. I placed it on the back of the canvas and on the wall. Problem solved!

 

 

You’re done!

- Chelsey, The Paper Mama

 

A little side note: even though I’d love to cover my ugly thermostat, this would not be a good thing to do. The thermostat needs to read the temperature in the room, and can’t do that if covered.