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What should I do if the center of my cake sinks after I remove it from the oven?

If I remove a perfect-looking cake from the oven, then notice later—while it is cooling—that it has sunk in the center, can I return it to the oven to bake longer?
Submitted by kayla.b.craig

This happens to everybody once in a while. Unfortunately, by the time a cake has cooled, its leavening has been deactivated and the air holes that create the cake’s light texture have closed and stuck together—so putting the cake back in the oven will not save it.

Check carefully, though—many cakes sink in the center, which may not mean that the cake is underbaked. If you have tested the cake’s doneness   with a toothpick that came out with just a few moist crumbs attached, chances are you have just baked a nice moist cake, and all you have to do is disguise the low spot with frosting or whipped cream.

If you find that the cake is runny and raw in the middle, just scoop out that part and serve the rest.

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THIS IS THE ANSWER. If you are following the right recipe and it is still sinking: First try this in order. 1. Do not open the oven during baking until the very end. 2. When you think the cake is done, stick a small knife in the middle -- if it comes up clean then its done. If after doing the two above and your cake is still "sinking when you take it out of the oven" and you are using a "MIXER OR STAND MIXER" then number three below is the problem. 3. Do not use a mixer - you are over mixing. It only took me ten waisted cakes to realize this. Until one knows how to use a stand mixer or the right mixing speeds, "do not use" -- it will destroy a cake. I was using a kitchenaid mixer to mix all the ingredients. THE PROBLEM: OVERMIXING. Who would have guess making a cake is a science! How I figured it out was I decided not to use the mixer at all after destroying ten cakes. I changed and did everything by hand "the old fashion way". OMG.... the cake came out so perfect. OMG... never knew mixing or over mixing the batter could sink a cake!!!! So I tested it again and made another 9 cakes the old fashion way and not one problem with sinking. All came out beautifully.. Nice and moist -- oh so moist!!!!!!!!!!! The best moist cake: 2 cups all purpose flour 2 teaspoons baking powder 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 cup unsalted butter, room temperature 1 1/4 cups sugar (or use ony 1 cup if you don't want it too sweet) 3 large eggs, room temperature 1 tablespoon pure vanilla 3/4 cup whole milk room temp 1/2 cup sour cream My suggestion --- do it the "old way" -- by hand. If you want you can mix the wet ingredients in the mixer but "MIX IN THE FLOUR/DRY INGREDIENTS BY HAND". It will be the best cake you ever tasted!!!! no kidding. Oh ... and don't forget to greese and flour the baking pan.
Submitted by bamgirl7